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Full text of "Hacawa"

Carl A. Rudisill Library 

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College Song 

Fair star of Caroline, our College glorious. 

Our College loved by all, to thee we sing. 
May she forever shine, clear and bright, victorious, 

To her our song of loyalty we bring. 

Refrain 
Fling wide the red and black, sing aloud her praises! 
This is the song we sing, Lenoir Rhyne, to thee. 

Fair star of Caroline, our Alma Mater, 
Our College best of all in this broad land. 

Thou best beloved of every son and every daughter, 
Thy children hail thy name on every hand. 




1927 



The Year Book of 

LENOIR RHYNE COLLEGE 



HICKORY, NORTH CAROLINA 



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fAF.LA rilfuiwiLL U3«UtfW 
LENOin-RHYNE COLLEGE 






To bring before you in the years to be, 
Mem'ries of days you spent at L. R. C. 
To recall the face of an old time friend, 
All your broken mem'ries to patch and mend. 

Mem'ries of test days, holidays, plain days 
Will all seem dearer to your future gaze 

Time v?ill proVe all things" is an old, old, sa\tf 
So time alone can proVe this H AC AW A. 






Book I The College 

Book II Tke Classes 

Book III Administration 

Book IV Athletics 

Book V Organizations 

Book VI Features 

Book VII Tke Havoker 





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Staff 



Lucy Gaylord Editor-in-Chief 

J. Lee Cauble . . . . Editor-in-Chief 

Mary E. Blackwelder Diarist 

Bonnie Mae Beam Art Editor 

Frank Turner Sport Editor 

Hugh V. Overcash Business Manager 

Walter Fox Assistant Business Manager 

Marvin Lentz Advertising Manager 





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Spirit 




ENOIR RHYNE is a good sport in the best sense of the word. 

She has never thought that she was the only pebble on the beach ; 

nor does she imagine that she alone has the chorus of heaven 
and that all others are woefully out of tune. Ambition she has — and 
that to live up to the best that is in her- — in her possibilities, her oppor- 
tunities — to find and do promptly, faithfully, and well her part of the 
world's work. She has not, nor covets, the big "I" and little "U" spirit. 
She is not a holier-than-thou Pharisee. Hers is the spirit of good sports- 
manship, good fellowship, neighborliness, sympathy, helpfulness. She 
honors, respects, loves her neighbors — glories in their success, and longs 
and strives to be a more and more worthy companion. Nothing mys- 
terious, unique in Lenoir Rhyne spirit — it is Christian. 

Such is her spirit — may it ever be the spirit of her children. 

Dr. R. L. Fritz. 



PAWA'AyAwrararare 



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ENTRANCE TO L. R. C. CAMPUS 



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Qlasses 





Robert Hugh Kepley 

Most Dignified Senior 



HACAWA, 1927 





Bettie Schaeffer, Mascot 

Senior Class 

Colors: Purple and Gold Flower: Dorothy Perkins Rose 

Motto: "Esse Quam Videre." 

Officers 

J. Frank Turner President 

Louise Brandon rice-President 

Clifton Hood Secretary-Treasurer 

Lena Greever Historian 

Ruth Coon Prophet 

Yell 

Rah ! Rah ! Rah ! 

Who are we ? 

Seniors! 

L. R. C. ('27). 




HACAWA, 1927 




Hazel Lorene Beam, A.B 

GROVETOWN, GA. 



Eumenean, Treasurer, '27; Junior 
Play, '26; Cosmopolitan Club, 
Secretary, '27; Luther League; 
Brothers and Sisters Club; Honor 
Roll. 



Lorene is an attractive and 
charming girl. She has great 
natural ability in several lines. 
Perhaps her chief characteristic 
is her friendliness, and her 
schoolmates will always cherish 
a memory of her pleasant smile. 
She is the kind of a girl who 
never fails to do her part in any 
task that may fall her lot. 



Bonnie Mae Beam, A.B. 

GROVETOWN, GA. 



Eumenean. Secretary, '25, Treas- 
urer, '26, President, '26; Art Ed- 
itor, "Hacawa," '27; Luther 
League; Cosmopolitan Club; Hon- 
or Roll; Junior Pla^, '26. 

Bonnie has been one of the most 
loyal members of our class for 
the entire four years. In class 
activities she has always taken 
an active part. She is an excel- 
lent student, having been on the 
Honor Roll for four years. If 
she enters Life's work with the 
same determination that she has 
manifested during her college 
career, nothing will hinder her 
from repeating her past record 
in the world at large. 




Mary E. Blackwelder, A.B. 

CONCORD, N. C. 



Philalethian, President, '26; Glee 
Club, '26, '27; Assistant Cheer 
Leader, '25, '26; Junior Play, '26; 
Commencement Play, '26; "Lenoir- 
Rhynean" Staff, '27; "Haeawa" 
Diarist, '27; Best All-Round Girl, 
'27; Manager Girls' Basketball, '27. 

Combining intellectual capabil- 
ities and social accomplishments 
in a pleasing personality, "Meb" 
is a rare gift from Marion Col- 
lege. Coming to us in our soph- 
omore year, she immediately fell 
in line and became one of the 
leading members of the class. 
She is very talented and is con- 
sidered by all the best all-round 
girl in college. "Meb" has not 
decided on a life vocation, but 
has qualities which fit her for a 
professional career. 



Henry Crawford Boger, A.B 

NEWTON, N. C, 



Chrestonian; Glee Club, '24, '25, 
'26, '27; Vice-President Student 
Body, '26; Basketball, '26, '27; Ed- 
itor, "Lenoir-Rhynean," '27. 

Some people impress one as be- 
ing capable of real friendship 
and loyalty at first sight; Henry 
is one of these. He is an ath- 
lete, a member of the Glee Club, 
has been our cheer leader for the 
past year, takes the part of the 
hero in our plays, is an earnest 
church worker and a good stu- 
dent. Good luck to you, Henry. 





Rebecca is a loyal member of 
our class, a good student and an 
earnest worker. "Beck" is al- 
ways jolly, and where she is 
there is always sunshine. She 
is sound in character, modest, re- 
ligious, and attractive. She is 
fair and square to everyone ; she 
is always able to answer with 
some witty remark, although she 
gets her words mixed sometimes, 
but this only adds to the humor. 
Happiness awaits her in what- 
ever activity she chooses. 




Mary Elizabeth Deal, A.B 

MOORESVILLE, N. C. 



Philalethian; Chaplain, '25; Secre- 
tary, '25, '26; Rowan County Club; 
Crusader, '26; Student Cabinet, 
'2G, '27; Oakview Commission, '26, 
'27; Honor Roll, '24, '25; Luther 
League. 

Capable, sincere, modest, digni- 
fied, and kind — that's Mary. She 
is a real student ; although quiet 
and unassuming she has the in- 
formation when called upon. We 
have found her a loyal support- 
er of all undertakings of her 
class, society, and the student 
body. To her, work comes first, 
play second, and men afterwards. 
Mary, your classmates wish you 
the best of everything that the 
future has in store. 



Vera Grace Crouch., A.B. 

HICKORY, N. c. 



Philalethian, Treasurer, '27; Hick- 
ory Nut Ciub; Catawba County 
Club; Honor Roll, '24, '25, '26. 

Vera's ready smile and winsome 
disposition have won for her 
many friends, for everyone ad- 
mires her. Her personality, 
scholarship and modesty prove 
her to be of lofty character. She 
always greets everyone with a 
smile and scatters sunshine wher- 
ever she goes. Here's wishing to 
Vera, our loyal classmate, the 
most happiness and success that 
life offers. 





"Red" has been with us only 
two years, yet we have found 
that she is a good student even 
in that short time. We wonder 
how she makes the grades she 
does and yet carry a novel with 
her all the time. You may see 
"Red" at all the athletic games 
"rooting" with all her energy. 
We predict for her a success in 
whatever sphere of life work 
she undertakes. 




Ethel Agusta Kiser, A.B. 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



Eumenean, Secretary, '25; Honor 
Roll, '24; Vice-President Class, '26; 
Basketball Team. Captain, '24, '27; 
Junior Play, '26; Oak View C 
mission. '25; "Lenoir Rhynean" 
Staff, '26. 

Ethel came to L. R. C. from 
Tryon Hi. She has made a 
splendid record at Lenoir Rhyne, 
and is a steady, loyal student, 
one who always puts her school 
work first; yet she takes an ac- 
tive part in all college activities. 
She is very much interested in 
basketball, of which she is cap- 
tain. Ethel is loved by everyone 
who knows her, and her place 
as an athlete and student will 
be no easy one to fill. 



John White Iddings, A.B. 

EAST SPENCER, N. C. 



Euronian; "Lenoir Rhynean" Staff, 
'26, '27; "The Rivals," '27; Tennis 
Team, '25, '26, '27; Glee Club, 
'27; President Luther League, '27; 
President, Diakonian Club, '27. 

To this member of our class 
much credit is due. White is a 
hard and dependable worker in 
class activities as well as re- 
igious work. He was a main- 
stay in the publication of the 
college paper during the past 
year; neither can we forget his 
ability as an actor. White plans 
to enter the ministry, and we are 
sure, with his personality and 
ability, he will attain success in 
this high and noble calling. 





Margaret Glenn Knox, A 

CLOVER, s. c. 



Eumenean, Treasurer, '25, Secre- 
tary, '26, President, '27; Luther 
League; Commencement Play, '24; 
Commission, '26; Cabinet, '26. 

Margaret comes to us from the 
Palmetto state, and has been a 
true and loyal member of our 
class. Margaret is sympathetic 
and kind, and is a friend to all. 
Knox enj.oys a good time, yet 
when there is work to be done, 
she is ever ready to do her share. 
She is a loyal society member, 
as well as a good student, and 
we are sure success will be hers. 



Robert Hugh Kepley., A.B. 

LEXINGTON, N. C. 



Euronian, President, '26, Chaplain, 
'27; Cosmopolitan Club; Honor 
Roll, '24, '25, '26; Hiland Hall 
Commission, '25, '26; Student Cab- 
inet, '26. 

Hugh came to Lenoir Rhyne 
from Lexington Hi and entered 
as a freshman. He has held a 
distinctive place in the class and 
has made his mark. He has an 
unusual power of reasoning and 
is talented with both originality 
and individuality. Small in 
stature, but by no means small 
intellectually. Kepley has chosen 
the gospel ministry as his life's 
work, and we predict for him a 
bright future. 







William Rudolph Lingle, A. 



Catawba College, '22, '23; Eumen- 
ean; Baby Club, '24; Catawba 
County Club, '24, '27; Crusader; 
Hikers' Club, '27. 



Ruth knows both sides of school 
life, having spent several years 
teaching. We are glad that she 
chose the right path and came 
back to graduate with us. She 
is quiet, but industrious and 
faithful, and ever ready to lend 
a helping hand. She says she 
expects to teach school, but it 
seems probable that Cupid might 
change her plans. We are sure 
that success will attend her in 
whatever undertaking she may 
make. 



MOORESVILLE, N. C. 



Euronian; Ministers Sons and 
Daughters Club; Brothers and Sis- 
Club; Cosmopolitan Club. 



Rudolph entered our class in '26 
from the University of North 
Carolina. He is one of our sin- 
cere and friendly students; he is 
agreeable and good natured, al- 
though somewhat impulsive. He 
greatly enjoys life and all the 
pleasures that go with it. By 
this we do not mean to say, how- 
ever, that he is not a good stu- 
dent; for in spite of these things 
he has managed to do a great 
deal of work in the last year. 
We wish you luck, Rudolph. 




O. Nicholas Lynn, A.B. 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



Chrestonian; Glee Club; Manager 
Baseball, '27; Highland Hall Com- 
mission, '27; Student Cabinet, '27; 
Male Quartet, '26, '27. 

"Nick," with a heart full of sun- 
shine and a soul full of song, has 
done his part in brightening the 
four years of our college life at 
L. R. C. He has many talents, 
but chief among these is his 
musical ability; therein lies his 
joy. "Nick's" magnetic person- 
ality attracts many to him, the 
opposite sex especially, but he is 
not at all partial. He has ever 
proved loyal to his school, class, 
and friends. Our wish for him 
is that he continues smiling and 
singing as he goes down the 
highway of life. 



Barbara Ennis Lutz, A.B. 

VALE, N. C. 



Eumenean, Censor, '25, President, 
'26; Honor Roll, '24, '26; Luther 
League; Crusaders; Lincoln Coun- 
ty Club; Brothers and Sisters 
Club. 

The mere mention of Bobbie 
makes one think of the attributes 
of character, loyalty, steadfast- 
ness, faithfulness, patience, and 
love. Bobbie is one of the very 
quietest members of our class, 
but she is the truest, the most 
dependable. When she is sup- 
posed to do a thing, there is no 
need to worry ; it will be done 
and done well. Her capability is 
shown in her class work and so- 
ciety. Success awaits you, Bob- 
bie, in anything you desire to 
undertake. 





Bernice is a town girl, but she 
has a host of friends on the 
campus. She is loved and ad- 
mired by both the faculty and 
the students for her sincerity and 
open-heartedness. In her you 
find a true friend, one who can 
be depended upon. She is jolly, 
sociable, optimistic and rarely, if 
ever, do you see her angry or 
blue. She has a deep sense of 
duty; she is prompt and depend- 
able. Bernice, though the young- 
est member of our class, is well 
fitted for the profession of teach- 
ing. We feel sure that success 
awaits her. 




Wayne Alton Pasour, A.B. 

DALLAS, N. C. 



Euronian; Football, '24, '25, '26 
'27, Captain, '26, Basketball, '25 
'26; Highland Hall Commission 



Wayne came to us from the Dal- 
las Hi, and has spent four suc- 
cessful years with us. The 
name, "Mule," was very appro- 
priately attached to him, as he 
is one of the most consistent foot- 
ball warriors of our institution. 
He was captain of the greatest 
football team in the history of 
Lenoir Rhyne in '27. Aside from 
his athletic prowess, "Mule" is 
an ideal student, classmate and 
companion, with a keen sense of 
humor and an abundance of 
sound common sense and a spe- 
cial interest in a certain straw- 
berry blonde. 



Hugh Victor Overcash, A.B. 

KANAPOLISj N. C. 



Euronian; Student Cabinet, 
'26; Hall Commission, '26, 
President, '27; Football, '26, 
Basketball, '26, '27, Captain, 
Business Manager, "Lenoir Rhyn- 
ean," '27; Business Manager, "Ha- 
cawa," '27. 

There is no doubt that "Vic" is 
the most popular boy at Lenoir 
Rhyne. From the very first day 
he entered college he has been 
a friend, a real student, and a 
man's man as well as a ladies' 
man. He has been one of L. R. 
C.'s mainstays in two branches 
of athletics — in football he has 
made a fine record, and as a 
climax to his athletic career he 
became captain of the 1927 bas- 
ketball team. Whatever "Vic" 
undertakes as his life work, his 
pleasant disposition and ability 
assures him success. 





Chrestonian; Hickory Nut Club; 
Catawba County Club; Orator, '27; 
Debating Team. 

"Judge," as he is known, is a 
good student, an orator, and a 
good sport. He is a "shark" in 
all history and government 
classes. He plans to study law 
and take up politics. We can 
picture him sitting on the bench 
in years to come, or perhaps sec- 
retary of state, or, who knows, 
he may be President of the U. 
S. A. Whatever he chooses to 
do, we know we will hear from 
him later on in life. 



Fannie Prue Rudisill, A.B. 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



Eumenean; Gaston County Club; 
Crusader; Hiking Club, '27; Luth- 
er League. 

We could not do without Fannie 
Prue, for with her sweet, modest 
ways she has won all our hearts. 
She has many admirable charac- 
teristics — friendliness, cheerful- 
ness, lovableness. One seldom 
hears her, for she is quiet and 
reserved ; nevertheless, we feel 
her presence. We wonder what 
she is planning to do in the fu- 
ture. Whatever it may be, may 
happiness and success attend her. 



ipi, m liyj|ir 



c 





Oliver David Smith, A.B 

CONOVER, N. C. 



Chrestonian; Biology Laboratory 
Assistant, '27; Catawba County 
Club; Brothers and Sisters Club. 

Smith came to L. R. C. from 
Concordia College. He is a stu- 
dent that is somewhat laconic; 
for this reason he is not as wide- 
ly known as some students. 
When one associates with him, 
one finds a friend of sterling 
character. Smith is a hard 
worker, who is patient and per- 
sistent. Kiology seems to be his 
hobby. He does not associate 
with the co-eds on the campus 
to any great extent. From re- 
port, Conover claims his social 
interest. As far as is known, he 
is planning to teach. In this pro- 
fession we wish him well. 



Madge Violet Sigmon, A.B. 

HICKORY, N. C. 



Philalethian ; Hickory Nut Club; 
Catawba County Club; Brothers 
and Sisters Club. 

Fortunate, indeed, was the Class 
of '27 in receiving Madge as a 
member this year. She adds to 
the scholarship and beauty of 
the class. Quiet, amiable, and 
dignified — these are outstanding 
characteristics of Madge. With 
these charming qualities, success 
and happiness cannot but be 
hers, be it in the school room, or 
brightening the home of some 
lucky man. 




Senior Class History 




HERE is always a great problem confronting High School graduates, who 
expect to continue their education, and that problem must be solved. It is 
this: "What College shall I attend"? Over a hundred boys and girls wisely 
selected Lenoir Rhyne, and at the beginning of the I923~'24 session, entered the halls 
of our beloved College. Thus, our history began. 

During our Freshman year, we were conscious of our insignificance and usually 
did as we were told — for a while at least. However as we became better acquainted 
with College life, we formed new and lasting friendships which were never to be broken. 

Time passed quickly by and the following fall found us back on the old hill, not as 
"Rats," but as wise Sophs. This year, we, as a class decided to abolish hazing com- 
pletely, and thus have the honor of being the first class to ever do this. At the end 
of the year, we knew that half the race had been run, and that we just must come 
out victorious in the end. 

In our Junior year we began to realize the seriousness of our work. Practically 
all of our members returned, with a high goal set before us to be attained. It was 
during our Junior year that our friend, football captain and classmate, Baxter Gillon, 
so nobly and valiantly laid down his life for his Alma Mater. Yes, we have missed 
him, but that never-dying spirit of loyalty has predominated through our College 
career. 

Not only have we furnished a great deal of athletic material for the various 
sports, but also in other fields of activity, such as debating, playmaking and literary 
society work. For the past three years, one or more of the cheer leaders have come 
from our class. There are quite a few of our members who expect to become ministers 
after further preparation. Others expect to teach, while still others have different 
plans in view. 

Finally, we have reached the last rung of our ladder. We now go out from the 
walls of dear old Lenoir Rhyne, and will ever cherish and honor her name. And 
why do we call this Commencement? We have reached the point where we can look 
out over the world and see more plainly its needs and hear more clearly its calls. 
Let each of us as we say good-bye to our classmates and to our Alma Mater, be deter- 
mined to renew our pledge of loyalty to the ideals inspired by our contact with both, 
and of continued co-operation in service to God and to mankind. 

L. G., Class Historian. 



HACAWA, 1927 





Prophecy 



NE sunny afternoon, tired, lonely and weary of the society of my companions, 

I wandered into the woods to be alone. I walked until I came to a flowing 

brook, almost concealed by the trees, bushes, ferns and flowers. I sank down 

upon a bed of moss and rested my weary head upon the grass. As the birds 

sang sweetly among the branches, and the bees hummed gaily as they passed from 

flower to flower, and as the brook ran singing over the rocks on its way toward the 

sea, my thoughts went back to the Geology Class at L. R. C. and as I watched the 

erosion of the stream I wondered if it might not tell me of my classmates. My mind 

was centered so deeply upon them that the water began to tell me of my thoughts. 

It told me that Nick Lynn and Clifton Hood had just returned from a trip to the 

North Pole and had been exploring for quite a while. 

Lorene Beam and Nella Rudisill had won fame as movie stars. 

Ethel Reinhardt is superintendent of a large cotton mill situated near Alexis, N. C. 

Marvin Lentz and Frank Turner are in partnership and run a large overall fac- 
tory in Drexel, N. C. 

Velma Carpenter and Elsie Warlick are overseers of a large tobacco farm. 

Ruth Lowrance, after being sadly disappointed in love, is one of the world's 
greatest suffragettes. 

Rebecca Castor and Lois Carpenter are running a beauty shop in Concord. 

Hayden Cansler is manager of Woolworth's store. 

Lela Brotherton and Edith Seaboch are teaching and are making a big success. 

Edgar Temple and Madge Sigmond are married and Edgar is a successful per- 
simmon grower. 

Victor Overcash is one of the most influential bankers in Greensboro. 

Bobbie Lutz is doing wonderful work in India as a missionary. 

Hugh Kepley is a scientist and is trying to find a way to communicate with Mars. 

Bernice Miller taught school several years, then married America's ambassador 
to France. 

Bill Noah was engineer on the great C. & N. W. railway, but lost his job because 
he would stop at anytime to study Biology. He is now experimenting on how to grow 
blue and yellow striped roses. 

Lucy Gaylord is a novelist of exceeding genius. 

Henry Boger began his career by editing a newspaper, but lost his position one 
day while pondering over the word "love." Today he is the editor of one of the 
greatest magazines in America. 

Edith McRee taught school several years, but her kind and sympathetic heart 
prompted her in the founding of a hospital to take care of the sick dogs and cats. 

Edythe Getz is Dean of Women at Lenoir Rhyne College and matron of one 
of the girls' dormitories. 

In college Margaret Knox and Louise Brandon were inseparable friends and 
even in marriage they would not be divided, but still exchanged confidences over 
the fence. 




HACAWA, 1927 



Frankie Huffman is a talented musician. She is now in Venice and is thrilling 
Italy with her harmony. 

Walter Fox is a successful business man who stays out late at night and dines 
"at the club." 

Nita Mosteller is very prominent in society and is president of the Woman's Club 
of Hickory. 

Bonnie Mae Beam is married and is helping her husband to make a success as 
a manufacturer. 

Mary Elizabeth Blackwelder is one of the world's greatest opera singers. She 
married a musician. 

Margaret Freeze is a contractor and is now building the world's greatest filling 
station. 

Lena Greever finished the doctor's course and is practicing in Talorsville. 

Roy Whisnant and Kathleen Conrad were married and Whisnant is a successful 
minister. 

Lee Cauble and Jennie Lee Lineberger were married and are now in South America, 
where Cauble is doing great work as a missionary. 

Albert Spurlock, the great athlete, is still at his old tricks and will soon be the 
champion athlete of America. Many beautiful women have tried to win his heart, 
but in vain. 

Hugh Sigmon is one of the South's most progressive onion growers. 

Vera Crouch, after teaching several years, married a professional baseball player. 

Margaretta Seagle has become famous in the literary world. Her most famous 
books are written on "How to Become Beautiful" and "How to Become Thin." 

Theo Carpenter is a book agent and since his marriage is selling books especially 
for henpecked husbands. 

Fannie Temple has become famous as a dress designer. 

Elmer Carpenter and Wayne Pauour are big merchants and own a large men's 
department store in Dallas, N. C. 

Rudolph Lingle has become famous writing funny papers for the Hickory Daily 
Record. 

Fannie Prue Rudisill is superintendent of Gaston County public schools. 

Hazel Clemmer has become famous as a cartoonist. Cupid has already settled 
his love affairs. 

Margaret Rhyne is running a large boarding house in Valdese, N. C. 

Irene Seitz and Mary Deal are deaconesses and are doing parish work in some 
large northern churches. 

Ethel Kiser is a girls' athletic coach in a Junior College. 

White Iddings is pastor of a large Lutheran Church in Baltimore. 

Mary Brooks is a successful life insurance agent. 

Katherine Herman is a dentist and can fix teeth without hurting — much. 

Locke Russel is a member of Congress and is trying to pass an act enforcing 
everyone to pet flies. 

Lucretia Fritz is one of America's noted stage actors. 

Boyd Robinson is a member of the Redpath Chautauqua. 

I had heard of all my classmates and began to wonder if I had been forgotten, 
but alas ! the stream had eroded so far that I only caught a faint whisper of my name 
as it went on its journey toward the sea. 




HACAWA, 1927 








Last Will and Testament 

of the Class of 1927 

ENOIR RHYNE College, State of North Carolina, County of Catawba, City of Hickory. 

Whereas, we, the Senior Class of 1927, being fully aware, that we will soon have 

reached the day when we can no longer be mothered by our dear old "Alma Mater," 

and feeling that we are about to depart from this life of perpetual turmoil, being of 

sound mind and uncertain age, do hereby make known, publish and declare this, 

Our Last Will and Testament: 

Section I 

Article I. To the President and Board of Trustees we hereby express our appreciation for 
their interest shown us during our college life. 

Article 2. To the Faculty, we express our gratitude for the kindness and sympathy shown us 
and also for the fine examples of noble manhood and womanhood they have set before us. 

Section II 

Article I. We will and bequeath to the Junior Class our prominent place in chapel, our 
Senior Dignity and our Senior P-r-i-v-i-1-e-g-e-s; hoping you will make use of them to the 
fullest extent. 

Article 2. To the Sophomore Class we will and bequeath our ability to overcome the many 
obstacles which confront us during college life. 

Article 3. To the Freshman Class we wish to leave this idea: "Be not wise in your own 
conceit." Do not be discouraged over your failures, but let them be stepping stones to something 
better. 

Section III 

Our personal property we do will and bequeath as follows: 

Article 1. I, Mary Deal, do will and bequeath my sweet disposition and friendly manner 
to Sarah Aull. 

Article 2. I, Lorene Beam, do will and bequeath my rainy day curls to Helen Hentz and my 
regular seat in Education V to Ethel Hoover. 

Article 3. I, Ruth Coon, do will and bequeath my ability to keep posted on the weather in 
certain northern cities to Prof. Aderholt, hoping he gets the weather forecast as often as I have. 
And to Alta r Rudisill I do will and bequeath my ability to handle a basketball. 

Article 4. We, Lucretia Fritz and Frankie Huffman, do will and bequeath our love for 
English professors to Violet Huffman and Beryle Frye. 

Article 5. I, Victor Overcash, do will and bequeath my little dimples to Frank Poovey. 

Article 6. I, Walter Fox, do will and bequeath my success as a barber to Robert Hollar, 
and my business ability to David Anthony. 

Article 7. I, Lena Greever, do will and bequeath my jumping ability to Miriam Gilbert, 
and my position of watching for the postman to Vennie Lee McCombs. 

Article 8. — I Hayden Cansler, do will and bequeath my excellency in driving worn-out Fords 
and my little mustacheto John Rhodes. 

Article p. T, Bonnie Beam, do will and bequeath my high grades and ability to answer 
questions on class to Elizabeth Lingle, hoping they will be as much benefit to her as to me. 

Article 10. I, Lela Brotherton, do will and bequeath my joy of hiking and my quiet manner 
to Ena Kate Lutz. 

Article II. I, Hugh Sigman, do will and bequeath my melodious voice to James Kiser. 

Article 12. I, Henry Boger, do will and bequeath my ability to imitate a dog to Prof. Pat- 
terson, hoping it will prove useful to him. 

Article 13. I, Lee Cauble, do will and bequeath my prominence at Oak View Hall to Wayne 
Patterson, and my position in the Glee Club to Glenn Bolick. 

Article 14. I, Lucy Gaylord, do will and bequeath my love for young men to Dorothy 
Norman, hoping that she will not love too many at a time and my high standing in all college 
activities to Mary Monroe. 

Article 15. I, Boyd Robinson, will my love for music to Johnson Whistnant and my slender 
features to Mike Clemmer. 

Article 16. We, Roy Whistnant and Albert Spurlock, do will and bequeath our places on 
the athletic teams to Henry Owl and Paul McRee, hoping they will keep L. R. C. in the front. 




HACAWA, 1927 



Article 17. — I. Theo Carpenter, do will and bequeath my room at the Barringer House to 
Prof. Setzler, hoping he may secure a sweetheart while staying there. 

Article 18. I, White Iddings, do will and bequeath my excessive avoirdupois to Hugh Beam. 

Article ig. We, Jennie Lee Linberger and Nella Rudisill, do will and bequeath our love for 
men, Chewing gum and onions to Joyce Rudisill and Margaret Mauney. 

Article 20. I, Vera Crouch, do will and bequeath my love for Math to Ruth Miller and 
my ability to drive cars in trees and ditches to Katherine Hester. 

Article 21. I. Mary Elizabeth Blackwelder, do will and bequeath my talent for dramatics 
and music to Dorothy Ritchie. 

Article 22. I, Bobbie Lutz, do will and bequeath my place at Good Hope Chapel to Henry 
Etta Setzer. wishing her the greatest success possible. 

Article 23. We, Hugh Kepley and Clifton Hood, do will and bequeath our speaking ability 
to Joe Michael Rudisill and Harry Ardnt, hoping they will become great statesmen. 

Article 24. I, Ruth Lowrance, do will and bequeath my permanent wave to Mary Hoover 
and my old love letters to Katherine Herman. 

Article 25. I, Ethel Kiser, do will and bequeath to Mary Miller my position on the Lenoir 
Rhynean Staff. 

Article 26. I, Nick Lynn, do will and bequeath my musical talent to Bill Thornburg. 

Article 27. I. Wayne Pasour, do will and bequeath my position as captain of the L. R. C. 
football squad to Hugh Beam, wishing him success. 

Article 28. I, Locke Russel, do will my ability to argue at any time and in any place to 
Perry Crouch. 

Article 2Q. We, Margaret Knox and Louise Brandon, do will and bequeath our love for 
playing tennis, for horseback riding and basketball to Elizabeth Cline and Helen Whitner. 

Article 30. We, Elsie Warlick and Margaret Rhyne, do will and bequeath our talkative 
nature and ability to keep on the good side of progressor to Helen Smith and Lucille Lipe. 

Article 31. I, Bernice Miller, do will and bequeath my ability to catch a beau at any time and 
to keep him as long as I want him to Miss Grothe. 

Article 32. I, Kathleen Conrad, do will and bequeath my schoolgirl complexion to Christine 
Eisenhour. 

Article 33. We. Edgar Temple and Oliver Smith, do will and bequeath our love for Educa- 
tional Statistics and for selling shrubbery to Roger Plaster and Roy Setzer. 

Article 34, I, Edith McRee, do will and bequeath my love for the animals to Earl Huffman. 

Article 35. I, Elmer Carpenter, do will and bequeath my dislike for the fair sex to Vernon 
Deal. 

Article 36. I, Edythe Getz, do will and bequeath my small stature to Pauline Finger, and 
my Senior Dignity to Glenn Eckard. 

Article 37. We, Edith Seabock and Fannie Temple, do will and bequeath our sunny smiles 
to Vivian Moose and Blanche Yoder, cautioning them not to smile too much at the unmarried 
professors. 

Article 38. I, Marvin Lentz, do will and bequeath my baby ways to Lowell Nease. 

Article 39. I, William Noah, do will and bequeath my handsome looks and winsome ways 
to Walter Sigmon, hoping he is successful in winning the fair one of his heart. 

Article 40. We, Frank Turner and W. R. Lingle, do will and bequeath our dramatic ability 
and our ability to cut classes to Nat Browder and Brown McAllister. 

Article 41. I, Nita Mosteller, do will and bequeath my ability to catch a man to Edith Sills. 

Article 42. I, Margaret Freeze, do will and bequeath my red hair to Eugene Rumple. 

Article 43. We, Mary Brooks and Velma Carpenter, do will and bequeath our love for 
parties and dances to Taltha Beam and Miriam Williams. 

Article 44. I, Hazel Clemmer, do will and bequeath my cartooning ability to Joe Moretz, 
and my ability in securing my better half to Claud Hewitt. 

Article 43. We, Irene Seitz and Ethel Reinhart and Madge Sigmon, do> will and bequeath 
our love for Psychology to Jessie Huss, and Edith and Alvine Rudisill and our Psychology books 
to Prof. Patterson. 

Article 46. We, Lois Carpenter and Katherine Herman, do will and bequeath our cosmetics 
to Gladys Morell and Pearl Whitener. 

Article 47. We, Fannie Prue Rudisill and Margaretta Seagle, do will and bequeath our 
favorite nooks at Oak View and our ability to attract the opposite sex to Gladys Roof and 
Rebecca Crigler. 

Signed by the Senior Class of 1927. 



HACAWA, 1927 










HACAWA, 1927 




Junior-Senior Banquet, 26 

Programme 

Toastmaster Frank Carpepnter 

College Song. 

Address of Welcome Lucy Gaylord 

Response Sam Sox 

Solo J. Lee Cauble 

Toast to Senior Class Mary E. Blackwelder 

Toast to Junior Class Nancy- Hall 

Music by Orchestra. 

Address Coach Gurley' 

Solo Ruth Potter 

Four Years at L. R. C Frank Cauble 

Entertainment Nick Lynn 

Music by Orchestra. 

Address President Schaeffer 

Song. 

Quartet: Samuel Sox, Lee Cauble, Nick Lynn, Robert Clemmer. 



HACAWA, 1927 





Junior Play, 26 



AMAZON ISLE 
CHARACTERS— 

Cyrus Quakenbush (a self-made millionaire) Roy Whisenhunt 

Reggy Rexford (a social idler) Hugh V. Overcash 

Simpson (a confidential secretary) Henry Boger 

Mrs. Daffodil Dare (the millionaire's sister) Lucy Gaylord 

Squire Sykes (from Onion Center) Frank Turner 

Pansy Sykes (the Squire's niece) Mary E. Blackwelder 

George (the colored butler) J. Lee Cauble 

Jack Daws (a young astronomer) Frank Carpenter 

Rose (Cyrus' younger daughter) Lorene Beam 

Violet (his other daughter) ' Edith Getz 

Bula-Bula (an Amazon lieutenant) Ruth Coon 

Lula-Palaza (a South Sea island queen) Bernice Miller 

Kathleen Conrad 
Louise Brandon 
Martha Seig 
Bonnie Mae Beam 
Ethel Kiser 



Amazon Head-Hunters 



Time — The Present. 

Place — The United States and a South Sea Island. 



Lucy Gaylord President of Class 

Mrs. O. E. Leonard Director 



J. Lee Cauble . . 
Hugh V. Overcash 



. . . . Manager 
Assistant Manager 




HACAWA, 1927 




Joyce Rudisill 

Jolliest Junior 

Junior Class 

Colors: Green and White Flower: Shasta Daisy 

Motto: "Nothing but the best is good enough." 

Officers 

Kenneth Rhyne President 

Jason Sigmon Vice-President 

Mary Miller Secretary-Treasurer 

Mary Miller Historian 



HACAWA, 1927 




Junior Class 




Roy Abernathy 

HICKORY, N. C. 



David Black 

LENOIR, N. C. 



Peery Crouch 

HICKORY, N. C. 




Franklin McArver 

RANLO, N. C. 



Glenn Eckard 

HICKORY, N. C. 



Annie DeLane 
hickory, n. c. 




HACAWA, 1927 




Russell Eavey 

SCOTLAND, IND. 



Pauline Finger 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



Claude Frick 

ROCKWELL, N. C. 







Claude Hewitt 

NEWTON, N. C. 



Ethel Hoover 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



Virginia Hanna 
hickory, n. c. 



HACAWA, 1927 




65 











Hi 






;],ii(W|| 


li 



Junior Class 




C. K. Holmes 

LINWOOD, N. C. 



Herbert Homesly 

CHERRYVILLE, N. C. 



Earl Huffman 

HICKORY, N. C. 




James Kiser 

CHERRYVILLE, N. C. 



Elizabeth Lingle 

MOORESVILLE, N. C. 



James Kirksey 

MCADENVILLE,. N. C. 




HACAWA, 1927 



Junior Class 




^^5^ 



Lucille Lipe 

LANDIS, N. C. 



Brown McAllister 

MT. PLEASANT, N. C. 



Margaret Mauney 

CHERRYVILLE, N. C. 




Paul McRee 

MAIDEN, N. C. 



Josephine Murry 

MAIDEN, N. C. 



Mary Monroe 
hickory, n. c. 



HACAWA, 1927 




Junior Class 




Mary Miller 

HICKORY, N. C. 



Rodger Plaster 

LANDIS, N. C. 



Edna Norman 

KINGS MOUNTAIN, N. C. 



r 




Joyce Rudisill 

MAIDEN, N. C. 



Dorothy Robinson 

HICKORY, N. C. 



Kennyth Rhyne 

GASTONIA, N. C. 




HACAWA, 1927 



Junior Class 




Jason Sigmon 

VALE, N. C. 



Blanche Yoder 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



Miriam Williams 

MARSHVILLE, N. C. 




Hugh Beam 

CHERRYVILLE, N. C. 



Henry Owl 

CHEROKEE, N. C. 



HACAWA, 1927 





Junior Class History 



|S WE draw nearer and nearer our goal we like to stop and think of our past, 
of those days when we were new students in the college, of our fears — and 
they were many — of our associations with one another, and of our growing 
devotion to our future Alma Mater. 

On that memorable day of September IO, 1924, we entered with the largest class 
in the history of the College. We numbered one hundred and twenty-eight boys and 
girls, not only from the Old North State but also from South Carolina, Indiana and 
Pennsylvania. 

Each new day brought forth new problems. We walked cautiously and approached 
the professors as we would some great monster. These fears were soon brought to 
an end as we became better acquainted. We were welcomed to the school by both 
faculty and upper-classmen. Great was our joy when the Sophomores gave us a party. 
The more we learned of Lenoir- Rhyne the more we loved her. 

At once we entered into the activities by furnishing the Varsity teams with our 
share of men. We were a part of the school, we could and were doing something. 

The year ended all too soon with a long lapse until we must enter as Sophomores. 

Again we wended our ways to Lenoir Rhyne to greet our friends of the year before. 
But alas, many of our number had left us, our ranks were thinner and much to our 
joy, new iaces awaited us. With a more hearty zeal we entered into our work both 
in the classrooms and on the campus. 

We initiated the Freshmen, made them fell at home by giving them a "kid" party, 
and then proceeded to apply the usual "Sophomore Treatments" for ailments so com- 
mon to the "Freshie." 

The Coach turned to our class to fill his varsity teams and was amply rewarded. 
Willingly we gave our men and joyfully supported them. 

Before we realized it another year had passed and we were jolly Juniors. We 
started the year by becoming acquainted with our "Little Sisters and Little Brothers" 
and all the new students. On Hallowe'en night we gave a Festival and were very 
much pleased with its results. We have the distinction of having as a loyal classmate 
the student who has made the highest average of scholarship in the school during our 
three years here. Several of our class have the ministry in view, one the foreign field, 
and many others the teaching profession. 

With many of our members in the Glee Club, with many going out for athletics, 
with the record we have already made we are striving earnestly to reach the goal 
which lies another year beyond us. We realize, as we failed to do in the Fall of 1924, 
that our knowledge is very small and that if we are to attain to the highest professions 
and callings we must be up and doing while it is day. 

M. E. M., Class Historian. 




HACAWA, 1927 




Hamilton Cox 

Wisest Sophomore 

Sophomore Class 

Colors: Green and White Flower: White Rose 

Motto.- "We can because we think we can." 

Officers 

Wayne Patterson President 

Vernon Deal Vice-President 

Jessie Huss Secretary-Treasurer 

Helen Hentz Historian 



HACAWA, 1927 




1 




Soph 



CL 



ophomore ^lass 

Coline Abee 
Earnest Aderholdt 



Hal Aderholdt 
Hazel Barger 



Glenn Barger 
Taltha Beam 



Lois Bost 
Nat Browder 



Isabel Caldwell 
Sallie Arndt 




HACAWA, 1927 



Soph 



Clc 



phomore ^.lass 

Vernon Deal 
Gladys Deal 



Lewis Deaton 
Hamilton Cox 



Hugh Coulter 
Guy Coulter 



George Grove 
Caroll Cline 



Baxter Hahn 
Lansing Hatfield 



' .' ■ ' '•(. 





'% 



HACAWA, 1927 





Soph 



Clc 



pnomore v_<lass 

Helen Hentz 

Catherine Herman 



Kathryn Hester 
William Hiller, Jr. 



Prunell Houser 
Euzelia Hauser 



Jessie Huss 
Christine Isenhour 



Pauline Karriker 
Ralph Lippard 




HACAWA, 1927 




Vinnie Lee McCombs 
Florence Mesimore 



Vivian Moose 
Karl Z. Morgan 



Gladys Morrell 
Lowel Nease 



HACAWA, 1927 





Clifford Rhyne 
John Rhodes 



Wayne Patterson 
Alta Rudisill 



Joe Rudisill 

Edna Scruggs 



HACAWA, 1927 



Soph 



CL 



pnomore ^lass 

Henry Etta Setzer 
Margaret Setzer 



Marvin Shepherd 
Ralph Stockman 



Edith Sublett 
Raymond Thornburg 



Frances Wagoner 
Walter Wilson 



Luther Hodge 




HACAWA, 1927 




77 



Sophomore Class History 




N September 8, 1925, the ship, "Freshman Class," with eighty boys and girls 
on board, launched forth into the deep waters of college life. Unaccustomed 
to this life, we were at first homesick and blue, and try as we might we could 
not conceal the fact that we were timid and green, and for this reason we 
were christened as "greenies" and "rats" by our upper-classmen. After we became 
better acquainted, our class was organized, with Carl Morgan as our president. 

Soon we found that there was some excitement to this life. The Sophomores 
entertained us with a "Kid" party. Although we were treated as "kids," we must 
have improved some, for the "Sophs," in order to distinguish us from themselves, tied 
beautiful green bows around our arms. 

Later, we were introduced into "Society." We were allowed to choose the 
society which we wished to join. The class of '29 has contributed to the various 
societies some of the best and most loyal members of which the societies can boast. 

Durin gthe year we had various social diversions. In appreciation for the party 
given us by the "Sophs," we entertained them in the latter part of the year. 

A committee composed of several members of our class with the aid of one of the 
professors drew up a set of resolutions which were signed by every member of the 
class. The resolutions were to the effect that we would uphold student government 
and would prevent cheating to the best of our ability. 

The following year we found ourselves in deeper water. We began to realize how 
much we had to master in order that our voyage might be successfully brought to a 
close at the end of four years. Some of our associates did not return, but several 
new members were welcomed into our midst. Henry Owl was elected president. 
Later he became a Junior and Wayne Patterson was elected. Under his guidance, 
the class of '29 pushed on continuing the splendid work started in the previous year. 

In athletics, glee club and music, members of our class have distinguished them- 
selves. The class of '29 claims a large per cent of the letter men of the past two 
years. In the first part of the year, the annual flag fight was held. Our boys fought 
valiantly and as a result, won over the Freshmen. On the following night, to restore 
peace and good will between the two classes, we entertained the Freshmen with a 
"smile" party. 

Just a few days after the Christmas holidays the Administration Building, around 
which so many happy memories were built, was destroyed by fire. We sincerely hope 
that within the next two years, while the Class of '29 is still a part of Lenoir Rhyne 
College, that a greater Lenoir Rhyne will be built. Although we are handicapped to 
some extent now, we will all try to do better work and make the best of our mis- 
fortunes. We will strive to live up to our motto, "We can, because we think we 
can," so that others may be able to say of the class of '29, "They could because they 
thought they could." 



78 




HACAWA, 1927 





Eugene Rumple 

Most Typical Rat 



T 










HACAWA, 1927 




Fresh 



resnman 



ci 



ass 



Officers 

Marcus Pasour President 

Floyd Kiser Vice-President 

Miles Clemmer Treasurer 

Cloyd Hager Secretary 



Oren Abernathy 
Harry Arndt 
Sallie Arndt 
Sara Aull 
Paul Barringer 
D. J. Beam 
Carl Beam 
Leta Belle Beam 
Dewey Beattie 
Deaton Best 
Glenn Bolick 
Virgil Boozer 
Rochell Brown 
Lois Bolick 
Oscar Carpenter 
Eugene Clemmer 
Miles Clemmer 
Burgin Clemmer 
Glenn Cloninger 
Homer Coulter 
Oscar Coulter 
Bleeka Carpenter 
Elizabeth Cline 
Edna Cobb 
Rebecca Crigler 
Wayne Detwiler 
Mabel Deal 
Mildred Eargle 
Gertrude Ennis 
Ruth Eudy 
Earnest Eubank 
David Farris 



Members 
William Fritz 
Beryl Frye 
Miriam Gilbert 
Howard George 
Cloyd Hager 
Howard Holshouser 
Margaret Hall 
Ethel Harris 
Mary- Hoover 
Margaret Houk 
Lucille Hudson 
Mary Huffman 
Violet Huffman 
Mary Lentz 
Macie Logan 
Ben Lentz 
Carl Marlowe 
Carl Mauney 
Glenn Miller 
Joseph Mor^tz 
Thomas Mott 
Thad Mullis 
Frances McCarter 
Lorene Mauney 
Leona Mesimer 
Ruth Miller 
Louise Moser 
Dorothy Norman 
Mary Pegram 
Nannie Plonk 
Willie Plonk 
Ellender Prather 



Marcus Pasour 
Charles Pegram 
James Pegram 
Lamar Rhyne 
Banks Ritchie 
Lawrence Rudisill 
Eugene Rumple 
Gladys Roof 
Ethel Scruggs 
Barbara Setzer 
Ruth Setzer 
Salome Shirey 
Emily Sigmon 
Helen Smith 
John Sanders 
Lewis Sharp 
Fred Sigmon 
James Smire 
Clyde Stepp 
Earnest Stroupe 
Glenn Swicegood 
Olin Swicegood 
Roy Swicegood 

WlLMER THORNBURG 

Red Winecoff 
Ivan Wittig 
Helen Whitner 
Pearl Whitner 
Marye Wolff 
Corrie Yoder 
Frances Yount 
Turner Phillips 




HACAWA, 1927 




HACAWA, 1927 





^%s 



82 



S2? 



^T: 




HACAWA, 1927 







HACAWA, 1927 





Prof. H. L. Creech 
SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 

Officers 

Elizabeth Witherspoon President 

George Mauney Vice-President 

John Aderholdt ... Secretary-Treasurer 

Virginia Hightower . Reporter 

Members 

Helen Klemme Mazie Hughs Virginia Hightower 

John Aderholdt Margaret Barrier Grace Klutz 

Hal Aderholdt Edna Bost Nannie Klutz 

William Blackburn Lilliam Bumgarner Frankie Jarrett 

M. L. Huggins Lucie Cole Gladys Morell 

Joe Martin Lucille Coltrane Wixie Robinson 

George Mauney Myrtle Dick Mary E. White 

Carroll V. Reese Cecile Green Marie Whitener 

J. D. Rhyne Kimmie Green Margaret Witherspoon 

William Thornburg Lydia Hamilton Julie Wolf 

Parks Underdown Ruth Yount 




HACAWA, 1927 




HACAWA, 1927 





Harry Arndt 
Carl Beam 

Mary E. Blackwelder 
Glenn Bolick 
Ruby Boykin 
Nat Browder 
Isabell Caldwell 
Lee Cauble 
Kathleen Conrad 
Rev. W. G. Cobb 
Perry Crouch 



Mildred Eargle 
David Farris 
Pauline Finger 
Mrs. Glenn Fry 
Mrs. Thomas Golden 
Elbert Ivey 
Lucy Johnson 
Lucille Lipe 
Ruth Lowrance 
Ruth Mesimer 
Lovie Miller 



Mrs. Clyde Price 
Dorothy Robinson 
Dorothy Ritchie 
Anna C. Rowe 
Edith Rudisill 
Joyce Rudisill 
Christine Sigmon 
Irene Sox 
Mrs. J. E. Wagoner 
Pearl Whitner 
Grace Yoder 



Jenny Lee Lineberger 



Pipe Organ 

Paul Wagner 



Mary E. Blackwelder 



Mabel Aderholdt 
Mary E. Blackwelder 
Sarah Aull 
Ruby Boykin 
Rev. W. G. Cobb 
Bobbie Crouch 
Lois Boliek 
Gladys Deal 
Mabel Deal 
Mary Deal 
Mildred Ergle 



if iano 

Ruth Eudy 
David Farris 
Virginia Hanna 
Frankie Huffman 
Pauline Karriker 
Jenny Lee Lineberger 
Mary Miller 
Josephine Murry 
Dorothy Ritchie 
Alvine Rudisill 
Edith Rudisill 



Joyce Rudisill 
Eoyd Robinson 
Clare Schaeffer 
Ruth Setzer 
Salome Shirey 
Helen Smith 
Pearl Spencer 
Mona Sigmon 
Gladys Roof 
Blanche Yoder 
Corrie Yoder 




HACAWA, 1927 



$ Mantlet ti§ 




HACAWA, 1927 





The Lenoir Rkyne Playmakers 



HIS year Lenoir Rhyne added a course in playmaking to the curriculum. Dramatic 
clubs and dramatic societies have been a part of college life for many years, but this 
is the first time Lenoir Rhyne has had a dramatic organization with a serious pur- 
pose. Taking our cue from the "Little Theater" movement which has come to life 
all over America, and from the Carolina Playmakers, we have tried to formu'ate plans 
which will create here at Lenoir Rhyne a serious body of earnest workers with a high aim. 

Under the capable direction of Miss Pearl Setzler, two years with the Carolina Playmakers 
and one year assistant representative of the Bureau of Community Drama of the U. N. C, we 
have achieved a fair measure of success, although the real work of the Lenoir Rhyne Play- 
makers is just beginning. 

On November the nineteenth, the Playmakers presented Sheridan's eighteenth century English 
corned}', The Rivals, in the Municipal Auditorium. The play was a complete success. On 
January the fourteenth, the Playmakers made their second appearance, presenting four one-act 
p'ays: Will O' the JVisp, Neighbors, Overtones, and The Masque of the Tivo Strangers. For 
th^se plays the Playmakers designed their own costumes, and gave the plays on a stage of their 
own improvising, due to the loss of the auditorium in "Old Main." Thirty students were 
used in the casts, and every one reflected his or her share of credit upon the organization. 

The Playmakers not only produce well-known stage successes, which is the least of their 
work, but essay a more difficult role, that of written drama. Each student is required to write 
one original play each semester. These plays are then discussed in class and the author receives 
suggestions and aid in the development of the play from the entire class. In this way the 
Playmakers turn out work of distinction. 

The purpose of these plays is to represent the traditions, folklore, and the various phases of 
the present-day life of our people. We believe that there is much in the common experience of 
the people, as well as in the legends, traditions, and incidents in the history of North Carolina, 
that is worth preserving for the future historians. 

The eight best plays written during the first semester are: The Seventh Wave, a tragedy of 
the North Carolina coast, by Lucy Gaylord; The Quitter, a philosophical play of college life, by 
Nat Browder; Scars, an imaginative tragedy, by Mary Elizabeth Blackwelder; As We Think, 
a psycho'ogical comedy of college life, by Elizabeth Lingle; Bettie, a social tragedy, by Mary 
Brooks; Not a Man in the House, a village comedy, by Elsie Warlick; What Happened, a country 
comedy, by Fannie Prue Rudisill ; At the Corn Sliuckin', a rural tragedy, by Irene Seitz. Four 
of these plays are being chosen for production. We are justly proud of them, because they 
show that the Playmakers are really accomplishing something. N. B. 



The Playmakers 



Bonnie Mae Beam 
Mary E. Blackwelder 
Mary Brooks 
Nat Browder 
Velma Carpenter 
Rebecca Castor 
Lee Cauble 
Peery Crouch 



Miss Pearl Setzer, Director 
Russell Eavey 
Lucretia Fritz 
Lucy Gaylord 
Edith Getz 
Frankie Huffman 
White Iddings 
Jenny Lee Linebercer 
Elizabeth Lingle 
Lucile Lipe 



Mary Monroe 
Frank Poovey 
Ethel Reinhardt 
Fannie Prue Rudisill 
Irene Seitz 
Roy Setzer 
Elsie Warlick 
Blanche Yoder 




HACAWA, 1927 





HACAWA, 1927 





J^^ie's " Neighbors ^^^^^^S^e/jcVa^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



PLAY SCENES 




HACAWA, 1927 





^Administration 




Faculty 



Rev. H. B. Schaeffer 

President 



E. J. Sox, A.M., D.D. 

Dean of Students and Professor of Bible 



R. L. Fritz 

Professor of Mathematics 

A.M., D.D., Lenoir Rhyne College. 



M. C. Yoder 

Professor of Biology 

A.M., University of Virginia. 



G. R. Patterson 

Professor of Education 

A.B., Midland College. 




HACAWA, 1927 




Faculty 



V. V. Aderholdt 

Professor of History and Government 
A.M., University of North Carolina. 



Adolph Schumacher 
Professor of German 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 



E. deF. Heald 

Acting Professor of Romance Languages 
A.M., Columbia University. 



E. L. Setzler 

Associate Professor of English 
A.M., University of Virginia. 



W. H. Stemple 
Professor of Physics 

A.M., Princeton University. 




HACAWA, 1927 



Faculty 



Miss Pearl Setzer 

Dean of Women and Associate Professor of 
Englisli 

A.B., Lenoir Rhyne College; Graduate Work, U. 
N. C, Columbia University. 



Miss Cere C. Grothe 
Head of Vocal Department 

Feabody Conservatory of Music. 



Rev. P. J. Bame 
College Pastor 



Ella B. Shirey 
Librarian 

Staunton Female Seminary. 



Mrs. S. G. Lohr 

Matron Highland Hall 

Student Lenoir Rhyne College. 




HACAWA, 1927 





Faculty 



Miss Minnie Rude 

Head of Piano Department 
American Conservatory of Music. 



Miss Mary V. Richards 

Assistant Piano Instructor and Glee Club 
Accompanist 

Philadelphia Conservatory of Music. 



A. S. Keiser 

Professor of English and Forensics 
Ph.D., University of Illinois. 



R. N. Gurley 

Instructor in Athletics 
Textile Engineering, N. C. State. 



H. M. Snyder 
Professor of Social Science 
Ph.D., University of Chicago. 



96 




HACAWA, 1927 




**37tv* 



HACAWA, 1927 




Officers 

Edythe Getz President 

Louise Brandon . Secretary 

Members 
Marcretta Seagle Jessie Huss 



Pauline Karriker 
Mary Deal 



Nella Rudisill 
Velma Carpenter 




HACAWA, 1927 




COMMISSION 




Hugh V. Overcash . 
Claude Hewitt 

Ralph Lippard 
Ralph Stockman 
Edgar Temple 



Officers 



Members 
Kennyth Rhyne 
Wayne Pasour 
Roy Abernathey 
Hugh Beam 



. . President 
Secretary 



Walter Fox 
O. N. Lynn 
Paul McRee 



HACAWA, 1927 




1 


^^ 




||L/y-._^ 




,M^ 



Board of Trustees 



Rev. W. J. Boger President 

Rev. J. C. Dietz Secretary 

Rev. H. B. Schaeffer (Ex-Officio) .... President of the Faculty 



(Term Expiring 1925) 

Rev. R. M. Carpenter Hickory, N. C. 

Rev. J. F. Crigler, D.D Charlotte, N. C. 

Hon. L. M. Swink Winston-Salem, N. C. 

W. B. Rhyne Cherryville, N. C. 

J. J. Efird Albermarle, N. C. 

(Term Expiring 1926) 

Rev. G. H. L. Lingle Mooresville, N. C. 

Rev. L. A. Thomas Concord, N. C. 

Rev. W. J. Boger, D.D Newton, N. C. 

J. H. C. Hewitt Catawba, N. C. 

C. A. Rudisill Cherryville, N. C. 

J. V. Sutton Charlotte, N. C. 

H. B. Wilkinson Concord, N. C. 

Congressman A. L. Bulwinkle Gastonia, N. C. 

(Term Expiring 1927) 

Rev. J. D. Kinard Statesville, N. C. 

Rev. J. C. Dietz Claremont, N. C. 

A. C. Lineberger, Jr Belmont, N. C. 

W. K. Mauney Kings Mountain, N. C. 

J. A. Moretz Hickory, N. C. 

Rev. E. F. Keever, D.D Wilmington, N. C. 

John Kellenberger Greensboro, N. C. 




HACAWA, 1927 




cAthletics 







[U L/3,7A/?y 
COLLEGE 




FOOTBALL 



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HACAWA, 1927 




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Lynn, Turner, Black 



The Three Managers 

David Black. Dave was fortunate enough to be player and manager of the greatest football 
team Lenoir Rhyne has ever turned out. With the aid of former Manager Everette Sox, Black 
worked out a stiff schedule, and the Maroon and Black proved themselves equal to the task. 

Frank Turner. Although Turner did not have as great a basketball team as Black did a foot- 
ball team, he had a successful season. He gave us a good schedule and handled the team in 
great style, and deserves much credit for his work. 

O. N. Lynn. "Nick" has been working hard on a baseball schedule, and he is about ready 
to announce it. He has a good one, we are sure. "Nick" says nothing short of a state cham- 
pionship in baseball will satisfy him this season. Luck to you, Lynn. 



104. 




HACAWA, 1927 




HACAWA, 1927 




Pasour, Overcash, SpURLOCK, Whisenhukt 



Captain Wayne "Mule" Pasour, End. "Mule" displayed his football ability by playing 
practically every position on the team at some time or another during his football career. He 
was an outstanding player at end during his Junior and Senior years, and it was "Mule" they 
called on to carry the ball when they needed a few yards for a first down. He received hon- 
orable mention on All-State team for the past two years. 

Hugh Overcash, Center. "Vic," at present a sheik among the ladies, but last fall, when drafted 
to the^gridiron, performed as a true and trusted veteran. He was always looking for a play over 
his position and was ready to stop it. 

Albert Spurlock, Fullback. "Spur" finished his football career in great style, and was placed 
on the All-State team at fullback. No doubt about it, "Spur" is one of the greatest football 
players that ever played in North Carolina. His side-stepping, running, and stiff-arming, was 
spectacular, and was surpassed by none in the state. The long punts he would get off in the 
games has helped to win many games. His place on the team will be hard to fill next year. 

Roy Whisenhunt, Halfback. "Flash" is another of those fast side-stepping backs. He had the 
art of getting away faster than any other man on the team, and once he got started he just 
out ran the would-be tacklers and was haTd to stop. His work in the Roanoke game Thanks- 
giving Day will be long remembered. 

Lenoir Rhyne o; State College 6 

Lenoir Rhyne 3 ; Roanoke College o 



106 



mmmm 




HACAWA, 1927 




Beam, Cox, Hood, Detweiler 



Hugh Beam, Tackle. This 225-pound boy was a strong cog in the Lenoir Rhyne line. He is 
exceptionally fast for such a big man, and no use trying to run a play over him, because he was 
a tower of strength on the defense. "Parson's" work in the State game will long be remembered. 
His team-mates showed their confidence in him by electing him captain of the team for next year. 

Hamilton Cox, Quarterback. "Ax" has proven himself a capable field general during the past 
two years. When the men he called on to carry the ball failed to gain, he would carry the 
ball himself, and he was always good for several yards, and often he would get loose for long 
gains. It was the true and trusted toe of Cox that brought us victory in the Turkey Day con- 
test against Roanoke. 

A. C. Hood, Tackle. "Brody" has proven himself the most consistent player on the team by 
playing on the varsity for four years. He was the kind of a fellow that gave his best at all 
times when in a game of any kind; he never let up until the last whistle had blown. Hood is 
to be commended on his good nature and his ability to make friends at any time. 

Wayne Detweiler, Center. "Red" just came to the squad this year, but he has shown us that he 
has the ability to play real football. His passing is accurate, and he plays a steady game on both 
the defense and offense. We are expecting great things of Red in a Maroon and Black uniform 
during the three remaining years he has at Lenoir Rhyne. 

Lenoir Rhyne 39 ; Guilford College o 

Lenoir Rhyne 19; Erskin College 6 



HACAWA, 1927 




j 07 




KlSER, Hager, RHYNE, Steelman 



Floyd Kiser, End. "Jack" played a sensational game at end all year, and deserves much credit 
for it. At the opening of the season Coach did not have a man to play right end; soon "Jack" 
showed his ability when John Rhodes was injured, and he was given his chance. He has three 
more years with us, and we are sure he will establish a name for himself on the gridiron. 

Cloyd Hager, Quarterback. Hager is one of those small fellows in stature, but he makes up 
for that in fight and grit in every game. His fie'd generalship, good judgment and hard wc<rk 
has yielded much fruit for the Lenoir Rhyne team during the past season. Our eyes will be 
on him and his team for the next three years. 

Kenneth Rkyne, Guard. "Ken" is another of those men who does not know what the word 
"give up" means. "Ken" has been a candidate for the varsity for the past three years, and by his 
consistency and hard work he was a valuable man to the team, and he received his monogram 
for the splendid work. 

Max Steelman, Guard. Max is another of those small men who make up for their size in 
fight. This is his first year to make a monogram, but he just missed it by a few minutes last 
year. Coach could use this little man at guard or end equally as well. He should make a val- 
uable man to the team next year. 

Lenoir Rhyne 40; Emory and Henry College . . o 

Lenoir Rhyne 21 ; Milligan College o 



108 




HACAWA, 1927 




McRee, Hodge, Rhodes, Sigmon 



Paul McRee, Guard. This man first gained favor with Coach by his ability to size up a play 
of the opposing team and stop it; he was the terror of the opposition on the defense. "Mack" 
was a hard tackier, and when he got hold of his man in the right way he always brought 
him down. He has another year to play football, and we are sure he will have a successful year. 

Luther Hodge, Halfback. This was the first year of football for Hodge, but with his ability 
to hit the line he should be one of the Lutherans' ground gainer for next year. He played an 
important part as substitute the past season, and should be capable of holding down a regular 
position the coming season. 

John Rhodes, End. John was one of those wide-awake fellows all during a game, as was shown 
by the many fumbles he recovered and ran for touchdowns. This man was also a hard man to 
handle, as many opposing teams found out. He could be counted on at all times, and he was 
especially good on going down on punts. 

Walter Sigmon, Halfback. The long gains through the opposing line and the accurate passing 
and his hard work in general accounted for many victories for Lenoir Rhyne. Due to an 
injured knee, "Chuffey" was not permitted to take part in all of the games. 

Henry Owl, Halfback. "Chief" got away to a bad start this season, getting his collar bone 
broken in the first game of the year, but he came back strong and was able to do great work 
for the team in the State game and others. He is especially noted for his cut-back plays and his 
end runs. We are expecting great things of Owl next year. 

Lenoir Rhyne o; Kings College 12 

Lenoir Rhyne 29 ; High Point o 



HACAWA, 1927 



109 












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' ~i jmerMMT^TV^^l ^J^w^ — ^~~- — *- 



BEARS STOP ROANOK 

iCoxe Boots Field ^ \ i 

Goal For 3-0 Win? ' % % *; , ^^ ^ 
Spurlock Is Star 1 S^>>?;' 



Ctitef Owl and Whrsenhunt Share Honors With Albert In Slasti 

Boiled Game of Football at Wearn 

noke Holds Under Goal Shadows. 






||Bears Guests At 
Deacon - Wildcat 
Clash At Charlotte 







Lenoir Rhyne Suffers Its First 

Defeat From N. C. State 



wt c- " 



Lutherans Played A Great 
Defensive Game But 
Offense Was Weak 




ifNoray™ 

mmmm 

. BY SCORE OF 39 TO 



EASILY DEFEATS 
ERSKINE. 19-7 



EBANS'STH VICTOF" 



^^f®T*'*X 



McDOWEI.L 0UTSTAND7N 
STAR OF THE CAME 



r „o« ^ aaa^" v-sSfSss** 




SPURLOCK Si 
RAPID PAGE 

lisp 

Little Soorijtg Is Done b\ the.W 
Week's eamee by Mem- 
bers of 8Jg Five. 



GIGANTWFIRE BURNS "OLD MAIN" 

^75,000 LOSS SWEEPS THE COLLEGE THURSDA Y MORNING 




HACAWA, 1927 





Hugh V. Overcash 

Captain 

"Vic," as he is known to the students, 
was one of the most consistent players 
for the past two years. Playing a guard 
position, he was a tower of strength on 
the defense and always a hard worker. 
He will be missed in the line-up next 
year, as he is graduating with the Class 
of '27. 



Capt. Overcash 



HACAWA, 1927 




Summary of 1926-27 Basketball Season 

ENOIR RHYNE COLLEGE supporters may feel disappointed with the performance 
of the mountain Bears last season, but when all the facts have been considered, it 
will be seen that the Maroon and Black cagers did as well as expected in view of 
adverse conditions. 

Only seven games were won out of seventeen played for the season record. 
The main feature of the work of Coach "Dick" Gurley's charges was their improvement as 
the season progressed. Beginning with only four men who played regularly on the quintette of 
the preceding year, Gurley finished up with a floor aggregation which flashed six excellent per- 
formers in Captain Overcash, Spurlock, Kiser, Hodge, Brown, and Hood. Pasour and Hager 
also did good work in the role as substitutes. 

The team which lost four games on the Western trip and four games on the Eastern trip 
was altogether a different team to the one that fought Elon, High Point, Guilford, and Catawba 
to the end, and which won decisive victories over each. The Bears were beaten several times 
by close scores, fighting their opponents to the finish before yielding the honor of victory. 

Only four letter men on the squad will be back next year. Hodge, Brown, Kiser, and Hager 
will be on hand when the opening whistle sounds for the cagers in the 'zj-'zS season, and a 
world of improvement is expected of every man. 

Of last year's squad, Overcash, Spurlock, Hood, and Pasour played consistently, and will be 
greatly missed by graduation. The teamwork of the Mountain Bears was of the best, but 
they were handicapped by inexperience. 

Members of Team 

Rochelle Brown, Center. Although this was his first year on the squad, "Roch" improved 
steadily as the season progressed. He played good ball at top form, displaying brilliant passing 
and accurate shooting. 

A. C. Hood, Center. "Brody" displayed his ability at center by his jumping and consistently 
working hard and scrapping every minute of the game. His floor work and accurate shooting 
was a great asset to the team and will be missed next year. 

Floyd Kiser, Forward. As this was the first year on the squad for "Jack," he fell right to work 
and won for himself a regular forward position on the team. His future as a great basketball 
player will be watched very much, as he has three more years here. 

Luther Hodge, Forward. Hodge has been high point man for the past two years. His ability 
to make goals from almost any point on the floor has made him a very valuable man to the team 
He has been responsible for many victories for Lenoir Rhyne in the past two years. 

Hugh Overcash, Captain, Guard. "Vic" was not at his best at the opening of the season on 
account of an injured knee received in football. His consistent playing and ability on the de- 
fense has won him a name as a real basketball player. 

Albert Spurlock, Guard. "Spur" has achieved for himself a name on the hardwood as well 
as a great football player. The way he played running guard and his ability to break up the 
offense of the opposing team was his chief asset. His place on the team will be hard to fill 
next year. 

Wayne Pasour, Guard. "Mule" was another one of those men Coach could send into the game 
at any time and be assured that he would play his position creditably. He was called on 
many times during the year and always proved himself worthy. 

Cloyd Hager, Forward. This being Hager's first year on the squad, he promises to be of great 
value in the future. He is to be commended on his good nature and hard work during the 
past season. 

Garnett Mitchell, Forward. Although "Doc" was with us only a short while, he got in 
several games and proved to us that he was a real basketball player. We regret very much that 
he could not stay with us the entire year. His ability to work on the floor and shoot from any 
angle of the floor were his main assets. 



HACAWA, 1927 




113 





HACAWA, 1927 






HACAWA, 1927 




n6 




HACAVVA, 1927 



ar\ 





IT I -Ml 



Baseball 

Roy Whisenhunt, Center Fielder. "Whis" has been on the All-State team for the past two 
years, and bids stronger than ever for a berth again this year. He has been named captain of 
the team for this year. His ability as a fly chaser and hitter will land him in the majors. 
Hugh Coulter, Riglit Field. This man can be counted on for a hit when a hit means most. 
A fast fielder and a consistent player is "Chuffy." 



G. Ray Brown, Utility Man. In this man Coach had a valuable player. 
hitter, a terror to all right-handed pitchers, and a hard worker. 



'Red" 



good 



Pratt Karriker, First Base. Pratt was shifted from pitcher to third base, then to first base ; 
anywhere he always gave his best and has helped to win many ball games for Lenoir Rhyne. 
Luther Hodge, Second Base. Hodge is another of those All-State men, and he well deserves to be. 
He was noted for his hard hitting and errorless fielding. Hodge was a dangerous hitter 
with men on bases. 

Herbert Homesly, Pitcher. "Hub" was our best and only left-handed pitcher at Lenoir Rhyne 
for several years. His pitching will be missed this year, as he is not back with us. 
Albert Spurlock, Pitcher. "Spur" developed into a good pitcher as the season progressed. 
He was also a good outfielder. He will be called on this year to do much of the pitching. 

Robert L. Clemmer, Third Base. "Bobbie" was the smallest man on the club, but he made 
up for his size by hard work and fighting. He holds the distinction of helping defeat every 
member of the big five during his college career. 



HACAWA, 1927 






Vr 1 r» I 




Avery Hardin, Shortstop. "Rabbit" was one of the best lead-off men in the state. He would 
get on base either by a hit or a walk. He also played shortstop in a creditable manner. 
Marvin Lentz, First Base. No man worked harder than did Lentz. He is a good fielder and a 
dangerous hitter. It was his pep and trusty bat that won many games for us. We are sure 
he will rise to great heights in baseball. 

Claude Hewette, Pitcher. "Doc" is the man that made many batters whiff for the third strike 
by his dazzling speed and sharp-breaking curves. He has two years yet on the mound for 
Lenoir Rhyne. 

Henry Owl, Left Field. "Chief" has had much success in ath.etics since entering. He is the 
first Indian to represent Lenoir Rhyne in athletics. His speed and hard hitting has been an 
outstanding feature of baseball for the past year. 

A. C. Hood, Catcher. No man has improved more in the past two years than did "Brodie." 
Hood took the place of Hazel Clemmer, and performed like a veteran. Much better than 
many thought he would. Though Clemmer is back this year, we know Hood will be hard to 
oust from that position. 

Baxter Moose, Pitcher. Moose was captain of the team and was a worthy one. He is known 
all over the state for his splendid pitching, twice picked on All-State team. Another of those 
fellows who had the distinction of helping defeat every member of the big five during his college 
career. His pitching will be greatly missed during the coming baseball season. 



11S 




HACAWA, 1927 




Hikers Club 



Sara Aull 
Lorene Beam 
Bonnie Beam 
Ruth Coon 
Mabel Deal 
Mary Deal 
Kathleen Conrad 
Lela Brotherton 
Edythe Getz 
Ethel Hoover 
Mary Hoover 



Members 

Ethel Harris 
Christine Isenhour 
Margaret Knox 
Pauline Karriker 
Ena Kate Lutz 
Bernice Miller 
Florence Mesimer 
Leona Mesimer 
Vivian Moose 
Mildred Ergle 
Edith McRee 



Dorothy Norman 
Arbie Propst 
Ruth Lowrance 
Dorothy Ritchie 
Louise Moser 
Joyce Rudisill 
Henry Etta Setzer 
Salome Shirey 
Fannie Temple 
Elizabeth Lingle 
Miriam Williams 



HACAWA, 1927 



119 





Boger, Beam, Boliek 



Our Cheer Leaders 

Any person who has ever attended any sort of a ball game realizes what an important part 
cheering, or the lack of cheering, plays in winning or losing a game, and the cheering depends 
on the cheer leaders. Lenoir Rhyne is unusually fortunate in having three good cheer leaders — 
Henry Boger and his two assistants, Taltha Beam and Glenn Boliek. These cheer leaders have 
led our yells when the last goal won the game for us; when we piled score on score; and, 
better still, when we have seen defeat staring us in the face. Henry Boger's never-failing "pep" 
has inspired many a shy freshman to yell his loudest. Taltha's ever-ready smile and Glenn's 
beaming countenance have encouraged many a person to keep on cheering when it seemed that 
old L. R. C. would surely lose the game. They have a part in many of our victories, and they 
really deserve our heartiest cheers. 




HACAWA, 1927 





Qlubs and 
Organizations 




00 




HACAWA, 1927 




I2 3 




Pkilalethian Literary Society 

Officers 

Lucretia Fritz President 

Frankie Huffman Vice-Presidetit 

Vivian Moose Secretary 



Members 

Sara Aull 

Mary E. Blackwelder 
Kathleen Conrad 
Rebecca Castor 
Rebecca Crigler 
Vera Crouch 
Mabel Deal 
Mary Deal 
Ruth Eddy 
Lucretia Fritz 
Lucy Gaylord 
Miriam Gilbert 
Lena Greever 
Margaret Hall 
Catherine Hester 
euzelia houser 
Prue Nell Houser 

Madge Sigmon 



Frankie Huffman 
Pauline Karriker 
Nannie Klutz 
Elizabeth Lingle 
Jenny Lee Lineberger 
Lorene Mauney 
Margaret Mauney 
Florence Messimore 
Vivian Moose' 
Dorothy Norman 
Edna Norman 
Nan Plonk 
Willie Plonk 
Arbie Propst 
Dorothy Rose Robinson 
Nella Rudisill 
Edith Seaboch 



124 




HACAWA, 




HACAWA, 1927 





Eumenean Literary Society 



Officers 

Margaretta Seagle President 

Bernice Miller Vice-President 

Velma Carpenter Secretary 

Jessie Huss Treasurer 

Edith McRee Chaplain 

Lela Brotherton Censor 



Hazel Berger 
Bonnie Beam 
Lorene Beam 
Taltha Beam 
Louise Brandon 
Mary Brooks 
Lela Brotherton 
Lois Eost 
Lois Carpenter 
Velma Carpenter 
Ruth Coon 
Mildred Ergle 



Members 

Christine Eisenhour 
Pauline Finger 
Edythe Getz 
Virginia Hanna 
Katheryn Herman 
Helen Hentz 
Ethel Hoover 
Jessie Huss 
Gertrude Ennis 
Ethel Kiser 
Margaret Knoz 
Ruth Lowrance 



Barbara Lutz 
Ena Kate Lutz 
Edith McRea 
Bernice Miller 
Ruth Miller 
Mary Monroe 
Mary Miller 
Ethel Reinhardt 
Alta Rudisill 
Alvin Rudisill 
Edith Rudisill 
Joyce Rudisill 



Fannie Prue Rudisill 
Dorothy Ritchie 
Gladys Roof 
Margaretta Seagle 
Irene Seitz 
Barbara Setzer 
Henry Etta Setzer 
Emily Sigmon 



Edith Sublett 
Fannie Temple 
Elsie Warlick 
Pearl Whitener 
Miriam Williams 
Julie Wolf 
Helen Klemme 
Mary Hoover 



Sally Arndt 
Mary Pegram 
Louise Moser 
Oma McRee 
Corrie Yoder 



126 




HACAWA, 1927 




ft .. ..'■• 



HACAWA, 1927 



127 



Euronian Literary Society 



Officers 

Claude Hewitt President 

Earl Huffman Vice-President 

Glenn S. Ekard Secretary 

Hugh V. Overcash Treasurer 

Roger Plaster Chaplain 

Glenn S. Ekard Reporter 



Members 



Glenn Barger 
David Black 
Glenn Boliek 
Lee Cauble 
Vernon Deal 
Glenn Ekard 
Luther Hodge 
Claude Huitt 
Earl Huffman 
White Iddings 



Hugh Kepley 
Ben Lentz 
Marvin Lentz 
Frank McArver 
Ralph McArver 
Glenn Miller 
Hugh Overcash 
Wayne Patterson 
Wayne Pasour 
Roger Plaster 



Frank Poovey 
Kenneth Rhyne 
Clifford Rhyne 
Max Sigmon 
Glenn Swicegood 
Olin Swicegood 
Roy Swicegood 
Frank Turner 



128 




HACAWA, 1927 




HACAWA, 1927 





Chrestonian Literary Society 

Officers 

Clifton Hood President 

C. K. Holmes Secretary and Treasurer 

Loy Huffman Censor 

Brown McAllister Chaplain 



Members 



Ernest Aderholdt 
Henry Boger 
John Baker 
Hugh Beam 
J. D. Beam 
Elmer Carpenter 
Perry Crouch 
Oscar Coulter 
Homer Coulter 
Russell Eavy 
Melbourne Farris 



Walter Fox 
George Groves 
Clifton Hood 
C K. Holmes 
R. E. Hollar 
Baxter Hawn 
Loy Huffman 
James Kiser 
Nick Lynn 
Ralph Lippard 
Allen Lippard 



Paul McRee 
Lowell Nease 
Henry Owl 
Locke Russell 
Joe Rudisill 
Avery Rudisill 
Banks Ritchie 
Edwin Rudisill 
Walter Sigmon 
Ralph Stockman 
Roy Whisenhunt 



HACAWA, 1927 







HACAWA, 1927 





fy'itoraw 



Glee Club 

Officers 

J. Lee Cauble President 

Pauline Finger Secretary 

Henry C. Boger Manager 

Glenn Barger Assistant Manager 

Members 

Mary E. Blackwelder Pearl Whitner 

Henry Boger Lee Cauble 

Paul McRee Pauline Finger 

Joyce Rudisill O. N. Lynn 

Kathleen Conrad Dorothy Robinson 

Glenn Barger Lucille Lipe 

Turner Philipps 
David Farris 
Mildred Eargle 
Isabell Caldwell 
Leona Messimore 
Harry Arndt 
Glenn Boliek 
Wayne Detweiler 
William Fritz 
William Thornburg 



132 




HACAWA, 1927 







JT:£m 




m 




HACAWA, 1927 




>33 





HACAWA, 1927 




Luther League 

Officers 

White Iddings President 

Lee Cauble Vice-President 

Karl Morgan Secretary and Treasurer 

Members 

Sally Arndt Pauline Karriker William Noah 

Sara Aull Nannie Kluttz Arbie Propst 

Bonnie Mae Beam Jennie Lee Lineberger Joyce Rudisill 

Taltha Beam Elizabeth Lingle Gladys Roof 

Mary E. i5lackwelder Ena Kate Lutz Dorothy Rose Robinson 

Nat C. Browder Bobbie Lutz Marvin Shepherd 

Rebecca Castor Karl Morgan Ernest Stroupe 

Ruth Coon Leona Mesimore Salome Shirey 

Lee Cauble Bernice Miller Roy Whisenhunt 

Kathleen Conrad Vivian Moose Blanche Yoder 

Mary Deal Florence Mesimore Olin Swicegood 

Vernon Deal Edith McRee Banks Ritchie 

Mildred Eargle Louise Moser Glenn Barger 

Margaret Hall Oma McRee John Saunders 

Jessie Huss Brown McAllister Wayne Patterson 

White Iddings Dorothy Norman Rev. H. B. Schaeffer 

Lowell Nease 



HACAWA, 1927 





Diakonian Club 

Officers 

J. White Iddings President 

Karl Morgan Vice-President 

Glenn Barger Secretary 

Members 

Hugh Beam Karl Morgan 

Glenn Barger Paul McRee 

Lee Cauble Wayne Patterson 

Vernon Deal Olin Swicegood 

Russel Eavey C. K. Holmes 

Earl Huffman Roy Swicegood 

White Iddings Ernest Stroup 

Hugh Kepley Howard George 

Ralph Lippard Glenn Swicegood 




HACAWA, 1927 




Christian Service Crusaders 



Officers 

Brown McAllister President 

Vernon Deal Vice-President 

Vivian Moose Secretary and Treasurer 

Members 

Sallie Arndt Jessie Huss Florence Mesimer 

Glenn Barger White Iddings Leona Mesimer 

Bonnie Beam Pauline Karriker Bernice Miller 

Mary E. Blackwelder Hugh Kepley Mary Monroe 

Lois Bolick James Kiser Vivian Moose 

Rebecca Castor Nannie Klutz Karl Morgan 

Lee Cauble Jenny Lee Lineberger Wayne Patterson 

Ruth Coon Elizabeth Lingle Arbie Propst 

David Deal Lucille Lipe Ethel Reinhardt 

Mary Brooks Ruth Lowrance Alvine Rudisill 

Mary Deal Barbara Lutz Edith Rudisill 

Mildred Ergle Ena Kate Lutz Fannie Prue Rudisill 

Miriam Gilbert Brown McAllister Walter Sigmon 

Lena Greever Vinnie Lee McCombs Henry Etta Setzer 

Helen Hentz Edith McRee Ernest Stroupe 

Catherine Herman Oma McRee Fannie Temple 

Ruth Hudson Elsie Warlick 



HACAWA, 1927 




137 




DacTs-A-Minister Club 



Officers 

Elizabeth Lingle President 

Mary Monroe Vice-President 

Margaret Hall Secretary and Treasurer 



Members 



Sara Aull 
Glenn Boliek 
Henry Boger 
Virgil Boozer 
Bleeka Carpenter 
Elmer Carpenter 
Lucretia Fritz 
William Fritz 
Margaret Hall 



W. H. Hiller 
Elizabeth Lingle 
Rudolph Lingle 
Mary Monroe 
Karl Morgan 
Gladys Roof 
Prof. G. R. Patterson 
Ellender Prather 
Mary V. Richards 




HACAWA, 1927 




Alpha Kappa Sigma 

Officers 



Mary E. Blackwelder . 
Pauline Karriker 



. . . President 
Secretary 



Members 



Sally Arndt 
Mary E. Blackwelder 
Mary Brooks 
Rebecca Castor 
Rebecca Crigler 
Nannie Klutz 



Elizabeth Lingle 
Pauline Karriker 
Dorothy Norman 
Arbie Propst 
Mary V. Richards 
Margaretta Seagle 



Salome Shirey 



HACAWA, 1927 





Brothers and Sisters Club 

Officers 

Bonnie Beam President 

Roy Whisenhunt Vice-President 

Ralph Lippard Secretary and Treasurer 

Members 

Bonnie Beam Ralph Lippard Mary Miller 

Lorene Beam Barbara Lutz Boyd Robinson 

Taltha Beam Ena Kate Lutz Edwin Rudisill 

Elmer Carpenter Frank McArver Nella Rudisill 

Blanche Carpenter Ralph McArver Roy Setzer 

Elizabeth Cline • Ethel Hoover Barbara Setzer 

Carol Cline Mary Hoover Walter Sigmon 

Hazel Clemmar Lorene Mauney Emily Sigmon 

Eugene Clemmar Margaret Mauney Helen Smith 

Mabel Deal Florence Mesimer Oliver Smith 

Mary Deal Leona Mesimer Edgar Temple 

Lucretia Fritz Charles Pegram Fannie Temple 

William Fritz James Pegram Clifford Rhyne 

Marvin Lentz Mary Pegram Kenneth Rhyne 

Ben Lentz Ruth Miller Johnson Whisenhunt 

Allan Lippard Roy Whisenhunt 



140 




HACAWA, 1927 




Baby Club 



Officers 



Lee Cauble 

Jenny Lee Lineberger 



Glenn Boliek 
Mary Brooks 
Lee Cauble 
Rebecca Crigler 
Edna Cobb 
Mabel Deal 
Ruth Eudy 
Lena Greever 
W. H. Hiller 



Members 

C. K. Holmes 
Pauline Karriker 
Jenny Lee Lineberger 
Ralph Lippard 
Nicholus Lynn 
George Mauney 
Mary Monroe 
Louise Moser 
Edna Norman 
Roger Plaster 
Glenn V. Van Poole 
Ethel Reinhardt 



President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



J. D. Rhyne 
Dorothy Robinson 
Gladys Roof 
Joyce Rudisill 
Barbara Setzer 
Henry Etta Setzer 
Hugh Sigmon 
Jason Sigmon 
Albert Spurlock 



HACAWA, 1927 





Rowan County Club 

Officers 

















Members 




Lee Cauble 


Marvin Lentz 


Roger Plaster 


Mabel Deal 


Lucile Lipe 


Glenn Van Poole 


Mary Deal 


Leona Mesimer 


Banks Ritchie 


Claude Frick 


Florence Mesimer 


Dorothy Ritchie 


Howard Holsouser 


Glenn Miller 


Arbie Propst 


Luther Hodge 


Karl Morgan 


White Iddings 


Pauline Karriker 


Vic Overcash 


Frank Turner 


Ben Lentz 


Wayne Patterson 


Julie Wolfe 




HACAWA, 192' 





Gaston County Club 



Officers 

Wayne Pasour President 

Frank McArver Vice-President 

Kenneth Rhyne Secretary and Treasurer 



Members 
Virgil Young Boozer 
Theo Carpenter 
Velma Carpenter 
Hazel Clemmar 
Burges Clemmar 
Miles Clemmar 
Melbourne Farris 
Jessie Huss 
Euzelia Houser 
James Kiser 
James Kirksey 



Jenny Lee Lineberger 
lorene mauney 
Margaret Mauney 
Ralph McArver 
Frank McArver 
Wayne Pasour 
Clifford Rhyne 
Kenneth Rhyne 
Edwin Rudisill 
Nella Rudisill 
Fannie Prue Rudisill 



Wilmer Thornburg 



HACAWA, 1927 





Cleveland County Club 



Officers 













Nannie Plonk 












Members 








Ernest Aderholdt 




Carl Mauney 






Dewey Beattie 




George Mauney 






Oscar Carpenter 




Edna Norman 






Prue Nelle Houser 




Nan Plonk 






Loy Huffman 




Willie Plonk 






Lamar 


Rhyne 






HACAWA, 1927 




Lincoln County Club 



Officers 









Margaretta 








Members 






D. J. Beam Ethel Kiser 






Hugh Beam Barbara Lutz 






Lois Carpenter Ena Kate Lutz 






Pauline Finger Ruth Coon 






Ethel Hoover Nicholus Lynn 






Mary Hoover J. D. Rhyne 






John Rhodes 






Margaretta Seagle 






Jason Sigmon 






Blanche Yoder 






Elsie Warlick 





HACAWA, 1927 




i+5 




Cabarrus County Club 

Officers 



Brown McAllister .... 
Mary E. Blackwelder 



. . . President 
Secretary 



Members 
Brown McAllister Myrtle Dick 

Margaret Barrier Ruth Eudy 

Mary E. Blackwelder Baxter Hawn 

Rebecca Castor Lydia Hamilton- 

Nannie Klutz 
Dorothy Norman 
Miss E. B. Shirey 
Salome Shirey 




HACAWA, 1927 




Catawba County Club 

Officers 

Henry Boger President 

Lois Bost Vice-President 

Mary Miller Secretary-Treasurer 

Members 

Harry Arndt William Fritz Dorothy Robinson 

Hazel Barger Beryl Fry Alta Rudisill 

Henry Boger Ethel Harris Joyce Rudisill 

Lois Bost Clifton Hood Edith Seaboch 

Lois Boliek Frankie Huffman Barbara Setzer 

Edna Bost Mary Huffman Henry Etta Setzer 

Lela Brotherton Violet Huffman Margaret Setzer 

Isabell Caldwell Ruth Lowrance Fred Sigmon 

Hayden Cansler Edith McRee Walter Sigmon 

Elmer Carpenter Bernice Miller Helen Smith 

Guy Coulter Mary Miller Oliver Smith 

Homer Coulter Ruth Miller Clyde Smyre 

Perry Crouch Mary Monroe Edith Sublett 

Annie DeLane Gladys Morell Johnson Whisenhunt 

Gertrude Ennis Frank Poovy Roy Whisenhunt 

Lucretia Fritz Ethel Reinhardt Pearl Whitner 

Margaret Rhyne 



HACAWA, 1927 





Old Dominion Club 

Officers 

Glenn Boliek President 

Lowell Nease Vice-President 

Lena Greever Secretary and Treasurer 

Members 
Edyth Getz Lena Greever 

Rebecca Crigler Glenn Boliek 

Lowell Nease 

Ivan Wittig 



148 




HACAWA, 1927 




South Carolina Club 

Officers 

Ralph Stockman President 

Ralph Taylor Secretary and Treasurer 



Members 



Sara Aull 
Louise Brandon 



Mary Brooks 
Mildred Ergle 



Margaret Knox 
Gladys Roof 
Ralph Stockman 
Ralph Taylor 



HACAWA, 1927 




149 




Cosmopolitan Club 



Officers 

Vernon Deal President 

Christine Eisenhour Secretary and Treasurer 



Members 
Bonnie Mae Beam 
Lorene Beam 
Taltha Beam 
Kathleen Conrad 
Hamilton Cox 
Vernon Deal 
Wayne Detweiler 
Russell Eavey 
Christine Eisenhour 
Lucy Gaylord 
William Hiller 
Helen Klemme 
Hugh Kepley 



Allen Lippard 
Ralph Lippard 
Vivian Moose 
Louise Moser 
Henry Owl 
Marvin Shepherd 
Albert Spurlock 
Olin Swicegood 
Glenn Swicegood 
Roy Swicegood 
Edgar Temple 
Fannie Temple 
Miriam Williams 



ISO 




HACAWA, 1927 




Hickory Nut Club 



Officers 

Perry Crouch President 

Mary Monroe Vice-President 

Nat Browder Secretary and Treasurer 



Members 



Nat Browder 
Perry Crouch 
Vera Crouch 
Edith Sublet 
Glenn Eckard 
Ethel Harris 
Earl Huffman 
William Fritz 



Ruth Miller 
Mary Miller 
Mary Monroe 
Joe Moretz 
Bernice Miller 
Alta Rudisill 
Mary Pegram 
Edith Seaboch 



Madce Sigmon 



HACAWA, 1927 





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HACAWA, 1927 



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HACAWA, 1927 






College Calendar 



SEPTEMBER 

— School opens. Campus infested with "rats." 
—A mad rush to get registered in order to 

save that dollar. 
—Very natural to be back on classes. Seniors 

hold first meeting. Lela entertains senior 

girls at watermelon feed. 
—Seniors go to show; are asked if they are 

from the country. Margaretta asks not to 

have it rubbed in. 
—Rules off for the "Son of the Sheik." 
— Philalethians give party for new girls. 
—College "Sing." 
—Faculty reception. Old girls "eye" new 

boys. 
-Crusaders meet. Address by Rev. Schaef- 

fer. Van Poole is taking a correspondence 

course in football. 
-Fire at Oakview. Luther Boliek runs from 

town to be a hero. 
-Woman's Association formed. Vic Over- 
cash visits doctor with complaint of heart 

trouble. 
-Girls hike and play basketball for first 

time. 
-Marvin Lentz is using special methods of 

beautification. 
-Society is sick. 
-Fresh-Soph fight. 

-Luther League social. Pep meeting. 
-Football! Beat Rutherford 40-0. 
-Faculty musical recital. 

-Everybody's doin' it! Doin' what? Hav- 
ing pictures made. 
—Boys rush Fair. 

OCTOBER 

-Ruth Coon asks Dr. Snyder if he belongs 
to the "Nut" Club. 

-Beat High Point 29-0. Rules off. 

-All the little boys and girls rush down to 
see the parade. 

-Stunt night. 

-Faculty reception at President Schaeffer's. 

-Beat Milligan, 21-0. Home-coming. 

-Luther League discusses one minute past 
twelve show. 

-When asked what Snowdrift was in Chem- 
istry I, Mark Pasour answered that it was 
a kind of baking powder. 

-Senior rings come! Whose will go first? 

-Knox and Louise entertain. 

-Defeat Emery. 

-"The Quarterback." Several freshmen fall 
victim to Cupid's bow. 

-Dr. Fritz reads a Psalm in chapel for a 
change. 

-Girls go horseback riding. 

-Senior girls pull candy and later serenade 
faculty. 

-Sunday in church Lucy Gaylord absently 
asked why the bell didn't ring. 

-Chicago Opera Company gives concert. Dr. 
Schumacher didn't like it, much to our sur- 
prise. 

-Miss Setzer (in play practice): "Everybody 
get on page -76." 

-Julie, Helen, and Lorene lose pillows. 

-Luther League weinie roast. 

-Defeat Guilford, 28-0. 



NOVEMBER 

—Juniors give Halloween festival. Huge suc- 
cess. 

—Bonfire and send-off for Raleigh. 

—Special train. Hopes, dreams, and aspira- 
tions fail. State wins, 6-0. 

—"Runt" Barger very happy. Everyone else 
appears as the "morning after the night be- 
fore." 

—Mr. Setzler (in Freshman English): "You 
may choose the topic you wish." (Topic in- 
dicated by letters.) 
Freshman Girl: "May I choose 'U'?" 

—Beck Castor (to herself): "I wish I didn't 
have "em." 
Lib: "Have what?" 
Beck: "Such big feet." 

-See "In Walked Jimmy." 

-Dress rehearsal for "Rivals." 
Whis: "Did you ever take chloroform?' 
Red Detweiler: "No, who teaches it?" 

-"The Rivals." Certain faculty members 
step out. 

-Snow. Mr. Setzler visits Newberry. 

-Turkey game in Charlotte. Defeat Roanoke, 
3-0. 
Red Detwiler envious of Rumple's red hair. 

-Professor Wright ill. Hail storm. "Rivals" 
have party at Mary Monroe's. 

-Holiday. 

-Pageant at church. 

DECEMBER 

-Christmas party at Oakview. Probably it 
caused several after-dinner talks about 
friendship. 
13 — Joint Philalethian-Euronian meeting. 



14 — Holidays! 



JANUARY 



4 — School opens again. Vera Crouch has a 

diamond. Rules off. 
6 — Miss Setzer makes talk in dining room. 
7 — Main building burns. 

9 — Campus has lots of visitors. White 
preaches down town. 
11 — 'Science building catches fire! Nick the 

hero! 
12 — "The Gorilla." 

13 — Gym catches fire. Night watchman. 
14 — Four one-act plays in gym. 
15 — Boys begin reporting their whereabouts to 

night watchman after 11:30. 
16 — College Men's Bible Class. Social hour 

changed to four o'clock. 
19-25 — Exam week. 
25 — Madge Kennedy in "Love in a Mist." 

FEBRUARY 

1 — Student body meeting on prohibition ques- 
tion. 
S — Half holiday for Mr. Dan Rhyne's birthday. 
16 — Argument in Senior Bible Class. 
25 — Glee Club presents "The Marriage of Nan- 
nette." 

MARCH 

1 — Big snow storms. 

2 — Glee Club starts on trip. Edith Rudisill 

gets left. 
3 — -"Just one thought in conclusion, 

And the thought's a hope sincere, 
That these daily school reminders 
May bring back mem'ries dear." 

— M. E. B„ '27. 



HACAWA, 1927 




169 



t Weather: t 
• Stormy • 



The Hawker 



Circulation: 
U. S. A. & Germany 



Vol. II. 



CAMPusvrLLE, Feb. 31, 1927 



72 Pages Today 



(For a Greater and Better Campus) 



Lenoir Rnyne Classics 

The Inner Shrine President SchaefTer's Office 

Less Miserable The Flunked 

Wild Animals I Have Known The Freshmen 

Dances in the Dark After Lights 

Pilgrim's Progress Four Years at L. R. C. 

// Winter Comes Christmas 

Love's Labor Lost When he Kids You 

To Have and To Hold That Senior Ring 

Main Street The Warpath 

The Age of Innocence Judge Swicegood 

Daddy Long-Legs Miles Clemmer 

The Sheik Prof. Setzler 

// Dr. Schumacher 



Fresh. Hager: "Is this the Woman's Ex- 
change?" 

Woman: 'Yes." 

Hager: "Are you the woman?" 

Woman: "Yes." 

Hager: "Well, I think I'll keep the one 
I've got." 

4? 4* 4* 

Miss Grothe (in terrific jam) : "This is 
awful! Why I am standing on one foot!" 
Cynic: "Yeah, and that one's mine." 

4 4, 4. 

Runt Barger: "Goin' to the fair?" 
McRee: "Didn't know there was a fair." 
Runt: "Paper says fair here today and to- 
morrow." 

4 4. 4, 

Wanted to Know Why 

Dr. Schumacher is not a Metropolitan Op- 
era singer? 

Prof. Yoder walks on his toes? 

They call Mr. Deal "Snake"? 

The faculty is so kind to the seniors? 



Dr. Fritz: "Mr. Mullis, what is a 'meta- 
phor'?" 

Thad: "A place for cows to graze, doc- 
tor." 

4? 4? 4* 

Swimming Coach: "Miss Lipe, put your 
chin under the water." 
Lucille: "Which one?" 

4. 4 4. 

Bug Yoder: "Now, class, we'll name some 
of the lower animals, beginning with Mr. 
Boozer." 

4. 4. 4, 

The Man Who Has the 

Biggest Feet R. C. Whisenhunt 

Longest Nose J. F. Turner 

Baby Ways M. J. Lentz 

Mockingbird Legs B. Robinson 

Opposite View R. Setzer 

Oldest Pipe E. Temple 



170 




HACAWA, 1927 




HACAWA, 1927 



LENOIR -RHYNE 
COLLEGE 

CONGRATULATES the Class of 1927 
upon the completion of their college course. 

YOUR Alma Mater wishes for you a 
happy Christian life and service; 

BIDS the other classes look forward to 
fuller and finer years at Lenoir-Rhyne as we 
build and advance; 

INVITES other children and friends to re- 
joice with us in our growing power and our 
larger prospects; 

OPENS the avenues of Christian educa- 
tion to the boys and girls of the church who are 
ready for college; 

PLEDGES to the church loyalty to the 
task that has been assigned and for which we 
live; 




HACAWA, 192' 



"BILL" "PAT" 

WILLIAMS & PEARSON 

"Always Something New" 

CLOTHING FOR MEN AND FOR THE 
COLLEGE BOY, TOO 

Phone 6 1 5 HICKORY, N. C. 



BUMBARGER'S 



Just 

"A Good Book Store in a Good Town" 
That's All 





WHEN IN NEED OF FURNITURE 

Our Prices Are Consistent With the Class of 
Merchandise We Sell 






Your Credit 
is Good 


Better Homes 
Furnishing Co. 


Get Our 
Prices 








1021 13th St., Hickory, N. C. 







HACAWA, 1927 








- ; 






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I 



LUTZ DRUG STORE 

Prescription Druggists 



On the Corner 



Stationery, Tablets, Ice Cream and Drinks 

Agents for Whitman's and Norris' Chocolates 



CLAY PRINTING COMPANY 

PRINTERS AND 
PUBLISHERS 

HICKORY, N. C. 



SOUTHERN DESK COMPANY 

HICKORY, NORTH CAROLINA 
Manufacturers of 

SCHOOL DESKS, OPERA CHAIRS 

AND 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES 




HACAWA, 192' 



WINCHESTER 

STORE 



BUILDING MATERIAL 
SPORTING GOODS TOOLS AND CUTLERY 

ABERNETHY HARDWARE CO. 

HICKORY, N. C. NEWTON, N. C. 



A Dependable Line of High Grade Watches, Gold Jewelry 
and Silver Novelties, Diamond Jewelry, etc. 

CLASS PINS 

Made to Order 
WATCH AND CLOCK REPAIRING 

C W. DELLINGER 



PHONE 91 



HICKORY. NORTH CAROLINA 



KELVINATOR 



HEATING APPLIANCES, RANGES, LAMPS, FANS AND 
ROYAL CLEANERS 

"Service Follows the Appliance" 

SOUTHERN PUBLIC UTILITIES CO. 

TELEPHONE 148 
ELECTRICITY THE SERVANT IN THE HOME 



HACAWA, 1927 








ILL APPEAL TO THE 



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^Ofy^ Uzxfr^, *^*# 

"CONOVER 



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DffiS^ &Cs^l\ 



Conover School Bodies are Made to Wear, Lacquer 
Finish and Many Qualities Worthy of Mention 

Inquiries Cheerfully Answered or Salesman 
Will Call 

JEROME BOLICK SONS CO, 

CONOVER, N. C. 



K. C. MENZIES, President A. B. HUTTON, Vice-President 

GEORGE BAILEY, Secretary and Treasurer 

HICKORY CHAIR 
MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

Manufacturers 
HICKORY, N. C. 




HACAWA, 1927 



GET STYLE, COMFORT AND SATISFACTION BY HAVING YOUR 

SHOES PROPERLY FITTED 

We guarantee our Shoes to be free from defect in workmanship. Come in and let 
us serve you; look our stock over whether you buy or not. 

D'ANNA SHOE STORE 

HICKORY, NORTH CAROLINA 



'We Fit the Feet" 



BISANAR'S 

ANY PRICE IS TOO HIGH WITHOUT QUALITY 

The Bisanar Store is a Guarantee of Quality and Value 

DIAMONDS, WATCHES, JEWELRY 

And Special Order Goods Such as Medals, Pins, Class Rings, Etc., a 
Specialty. Expert Repairing 

GEO. E. BISANAR 

JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST HICKORY, NORTH CAROLINA 



K. C. MENZIES, Presiden 


t A. B. 


HUTTON, Vice-President 


Geo. 


W. HALL, Secretary and Treasurer 


HICKORY 


FURNITURE 

MANUFACTURERS OF 


COMPANY 


WALNUT CHAMBER SUITS 




HICKORY, N. C. 





HACAWA, 1927 




PARKS-BELK-BROOME CO. 

The Big Store Where Most People Trade 



40 Stores 



PARKS-BELK-BROOME CO. 

Hickory, N. C. 



40 Stores 



A Liberal Cash Commission 

WILL BE PAID STUDENTS FOR TAKING ORDERS FOR 

HOWARD-HICKORY NURSERY 

Telephone 584-K 
HICKORY, NORTH CAROLINA 



HUTTON 8 BOURBONNAIS 
COMPANY 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Lumber, Boxes and Moulding 

Kiln Dried and Dressed Lumber 

Ceiling and Flooring, Poplar, Oak, Chestnut, 

White Pine, North Carolina Pine 

HICKORY, NORTH CAROLINA 




HACAWA, 1927 






WHITENER 8 MARTIN 

CANDIES g^ CUT FLOWERS sv^ FRUITS 
Everything to Eat 

"SELL FOR LESS PROFIT" 



BETTER PRINTING PAYS 

Tf we do your printing we guarantee you satisfaction. We specialize in the better 
class of Commercial Printing — Letterheads and Office Forms, Envelopes, Folders, 
Programs, Announcements, Cards, etc. 

HICKORY PRINTING CO. 

TELEPHONE 30 7 HICKORY, NORTH CAROLINA 





PIEDMONT WAGON S MANUFACTURING CO., INC. 

HICKORY, NORTH CAROLINA 
D. E. RHYNE, President. E. P. RHYNE, General Manager 



HACAWA, 1927 




CARNATION AND EVERREADY FLOUR 

Is as Good as the Best and Better Than the Rest 

MANUFACTURED BY 

HICKORY FLOUR MILLS 

HICKORY, N. C. 



SHUFORD HARDWARE COMPANY 

Established 1882 
Oldest, Largest, Best Hardware Store in This Territory 

EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE, BUILDING SUPPLIES 
AND SPORTING GOODS 

Mill Supplies a Specialty Mail Orders Appreciated 

HICKORY, NORTH CAROLINA 



P. O. Box 546 








Phone 45 7 


HICKORY 


PAPER 

Incorpc 


BOX 

rated 


COMPANY 


MANUFACTURERS OF 

PLAIN AND FANCY SET-UP BOXES FOR 
UNDERWEAR, CANDY, ETC. 


HOSIERY 


HICKORY 


PAPER 


BOX 


COMPANY 



WHEN IN NEED OF ICE AND COAL 
Call 261 

HICKORY ICE AND COAL CO, 

Finest Quality Coal and Ice 




HACAWA, 1927 



ASK US IF IT'S ANYTHING IN MEN'S WEAR 
We Dress You From Head to Foot 

YODER CLARK CLOTHING CO, 

"The Men's Store" 





COMPLIMENTS 




OF 


J. 


C. Shuford Co* 




HICKORY, N. C. 



Savoy Candy Co. 

"On the Square" 

Phone 199 

FOUNTAIN DRINKS 

LIGHT LUNCHES 

HOME-MADE CANDIES 



COMPLIMENTS OF 




DRS. YOUNT 


8 


CAMPBELL 




Dentists 




Office Phone 3 70-L 




Residence Phones 450-L and 


655 



Central Cafe 

Phone 49 

Good Food, Well Served 

REGULAR MEALS 50 CENTS 

Short Order Specialty 

North Corner Union Square 



SETZER 8 RUSSELL 

Hickory, North Carolina 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE, DRY GOODS, HATS 
CLOTHING AND SHOES 

-Peggy Paige Dresses for Ladies. Fashionwear for Men and Young Men. This 
is the Store Where You Get What You Like and Like What You Get 



HACAWA, 1927 




ELLIOTT KNITTING MILLS 

Incorporated 

HIGH GRADE SILK HOSIERY 

For Men, Ladies and Children 
HICKORY, NORTH CAROLINA 



Compliments of 

Dr. Glenn R. Fryc 

Hickory, N. C. 



HICKORY ROLLER 
COVERING CO. 



COVERS FOR ALL KINDS 
OF TOP ROLLERS 



Drs.Speas (^Larkin 

EYE, EAR, NOSE 
AND THROAT 

Glasses Properly Fitted 

Over Hickory Drug Store 



Martin Furniture 
Company 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Dining Room Suites 



HICKORY, N. C. 



PIEDMONT FOUNDRY AND MACHINE CO. 

(Incorporated 1902) 

CORLISS ENGINE WORK— GENERAL REPAIR WORK 
ACETYLENE WELDING AND CUTTING 



Iron, Brass and Aluminum Castings 



TELEPHONE 84 



HICKORY, N. C. 




HACAWA, 1927 



BAMBY BREAD 

Crisp, Dainty, Delicious 
ffl 

It's the Good Butter in Bamby 

Bread That Makes It 

Better 

"TRY OUR CAKES AND PIES" 
ffl 

Made by 

City Steam Bakery 

C. W. ELLINGTON, Prop. 



Abernethy Transfer 
Company 

"Reliable Service" 

Every Consideration Given Moonlight 
Picnics and Hay Rides 

Phone 250-147, Night Phone 11 



Catawba Gem Ice Cream 

Ask For It 

For Sale at Leading 
Fountains 

Catawba Creamery 
Company 



QUALITY WINS 

Factory Report Shows Three Hundred 
and Fifty Million Bottles of 

NEHI 

Sold Last Year and It Is Hardly Two 

Years Old. Did You Ever 

Hear of Such a Record? 

NEHI 

In Bottles 



Short's Taxi Service 

Headquarters at Hickory 
Nut Shop 

For Closed Cars Call 
P. D. Short 



PHONE 56 



RES. PHONE 713-J 



PASTIME GRAND 

HICKORY AMUSEMENT COMPANY 

J. F. MILLER, Owner and Manager 

The Home of First National and Other Standard Brands of Pictures 

CLEAN— COMFORTABLE— GOOD MUSIC 

Your Patronage Solicited 



HACAWA, 1927 





C a RUDISILL & BROTHER 



DEALERS IN 

Dry Goods, Notions, Shoes, Hats and Clothing 

From the Cheapest That's Good to the Best That's Made 
LINCOLNTON, N. C. 



FANNING'S 

The Home of Better Merchandise 

Electric Elevator Service 
to All Floors 

FANNING'S DEPT, 
STORE 



DRINK 




W0 




DELICIOUS AND 
REFRESHING 



THE SHUFORD 
NATIONAL BANK 

Newton, N. C. 

Capital Stock, $100,000.00 

Surplus and Profits 

$76,000.00 

A. H. CROWELL, President 

J. A. GAITHER, Vice-President 

J. Y. KILLIAN, Vice-President 

T. C. CLIFTON, Cashier 

W. C. F'eimster, Attorney 



PIEDMONT 

Cleaners and Dyers 

Real Cleaning and Dyeing 

Hickory, N. C and Lenoir, N. C. 
Phone 255 Phone 53 



Hickory Foundry & Machine Company 

Foundry and Machine Work of All Kinds 

Automobile Pistons, Pins and Rings in Stock 

CYLINDER GRINDING, MILL ROLL GRINDING AND 
CORRUGATING 

Builders of Special Machinery 




HACAWA, 192' 




"ED" "EB" 


M & S SODA SHOPPE 


STUDENT HEADQUARTERS FOR 


FOUNTAIN DRINKS, SANDWICHES AND SMOKES 


Curb Service Special 


ALWAYS GLAD TO SERVE YOU 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

HOTEL HICKORY 

HICKORY, N. C. 

Modern Fireproof Every Room with Bath 

Management LOWRY HOTELS, INC. 

W. H. LOWRY, President, Associate Hotels 



HOTEL ELLIOTT 

Suffolk, Va. 



CUMBERLAND HOTEL 

MlDDLESBORO, KY. 



K W. HARRIS 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN 

Groceries, Feed and Country 
Produce, Coal and Wood 

Specialties: Green and Dried Fruit and 
Natural Peach Seeds 



DRINK DELICIOUS 

ORANGE CRUSH 

Yes, from Real Oranges 

ORANGE CRUSH 
BOTTLING CO. 

Phone 44 

Hickory, n. C. 



Always Something New and Snappy in Ladies' 
Ready-to-Wear for the College Girl at 

BAYNARD'S 



"The Ladies' Store' 



Phones 223 and 76 



HICKORY, N. C. 



HACAWA, 1927 




Progress 



Steady, financial progress is the result of a systematic plan of putting aside a 
definite portion of your income. 

It means that you are further ahead this year than you were last, and that 
each year will be another step toward the goal of financial independence. 
One of the surest ways to start building a fortune is to open a bank account 
for regular deposits. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

Hickory, N. C. 
Capital and Surplus, $500,000.00 



SELECTO HAM 

"The Ham Delicious" 

SELECTO BACON 

FRESH AND CURED MEATS 
Distributors Canned Fruits and Vegetables 

East Tennessee Packing Company 

KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 



BUICK SALES AND SERVICE 


Of Course, the Best All Round Girl 


Prefers a Buick 


HICKORY AUTO CORPORATION 


Hickory, N. C. 




HACAWA, 1927 





YOUNT MOTOR CO. 




HUDSON SUPER SIX— ESSEX SUPER SIX 




CHRYSLER 




Sales 


Corner 1 1 th Ave. and 1 2th St. 


Service 



See That 

WHIPPET COLLEGIATE ROADSTER 

before you buy an automobile. 

JOHNSONS GARAGE 

Hickory, N. C. 
Whippet Four and Sixes Willys-Knight Sixes 



Young Men Want the 
Real Thing 

We Have It Here at 

ROSS S. HEWITT 

CLOTHIER 



Hickory Mfg. Co. 

HICKORY, N. C. 

Manufacturers of Sash, Doors, 

Blinds, Mantels, Molding, 

Lumber, Etc. 



"COMPLIMENTS OF THE STAFF" 



HACAWA. 1927 






HACAWA, 1927 




EQUIPPED WITH MANY YEARS' EXPERI- 
ENCE FOR MAKING PHOTOGRAPHS OF ALL 
SORTS, DESIRABLE FOR ILLUSTRATING 
COLLEGE ANNUALS. BEST OBTAINABLE 
ARTISTS, WORKMANSHIP AND THE CAPAC- 
ITY FOR PROMPT AND UNEQUALLED 
SERVICE. 



WHITE STUDIO 

Photographers to 

k 1927 HACAWA" 

220 West 42nd Street, New York 



HACAWA, 1927 




THIS BOOK PRINTED BY BENSON 





LARGEST COLLEGE ANNUAL 
PUBLISHERS IN THE WORLD 

HIGHEST QUALITY WORKMANSHIP 
SUPERIOR EXTENSIVE SERVICE 




COLLEGE ANNUAL HEADQUARTERS 




HACAWA, 1927